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Winter '15 | Issue thirty-one

The State of the Bees

Nancy Hayden | November 17, 2014 | Issues Archive

Nancy Hayden with honey frame

Winter is a great time to cozy up next to the wood stove with a mug of honey tea and read about bees. My own honeybees are snug in their beehives, but they’re probably not reading. They’ve formed a tight, buzzing cluster that keeps the colony remarkably warm even during the coldest winter nights.

Permaculture: Taking the Long View

Bonnie North | November 16, 2014 | Issues Archive

Devin Smith

In 1974, Bill Mollison and David Holmgren published Permaculture One: A Perennial Agriculture for Human Settlements. The charismatic Mollison then threw himself into traveling and teaching Permaculture Design Certificate courses, known in the lingo as “The PDC,” while Holmgren and his partner, Su Dennett, dedicated decades of their lives to restoring the blackberry-covered wasteland on a one-hectare property in central Australia.

Set the Table with Homemade Local Baby Food

Sarah Galbraith | November 16, 2014 | Set the Table

Baby Food Pureed Squash

Many of us spend the fall preserving the local flavors of the harvest season. Squash, apples, beets, carrots, and the year’s final greens are cellared, canned, and frozen. But the anticipated addition to our family of a new little one has me preserving these foods in a new way: as homemade baby food.

“Don’t Waste that Woodchuck…”

Rose Paul | November 16, 2014 | Garden Pathways

illustration wikimedia.org, Pearson Scott Foresman collection

That’s what I told friends for two weeks after feasting on woodchuck stew. Don’t waste your pesky garden woodchuck—eat it!

Publishers' Note Winter 2015

| November 16, 2014 | Winter '15 | Issue thirty-one

Mr. G.W. Clarke coming to town to sell butter on a Saturday in the winter of 1939, Woodstock, Vermont.

They’ve already started to arrive in the mailbox: seed catalogs, with their glorious photos and wonderful illustrations, calling to us, announcing the promise of a future garden—and of spring. We’re in!

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What we do

Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape ties into larger questions of sustainability and the future of our food supply.