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Winter '14 | Issue twenty-seven

“It tastes like…”

How we talk about—or don’t talk about—flavor

Helen Labun | November 26, 2013 | Issues Archive

Helen Labun Jordan

A food’s flavor can be hard to describe. We have a whole vocabulary for talking about how food is produced with terms like organic, heirloom, grass fed, pasture raised, line caught, cage free, community supported, miles traveled. 

How to Link to Land

Programs help aspiring farmers learn about available farmland in Vermont.

Andrew Stowe | November 26, 2013 | On the Farm

Photo of Katie and Jaska by Calley Hastings

“The key was that we didn’t know what we didn’t know.”

In describing their farm journey, Jaska Bradeen, 29, and Katie Sullivan, 30, of Sheep and Pickle Farm in Brookfield, return again and again to this problem, one that they and many other beginning farmers like them have faced when first looking for land.

Peak Phosphorous: Crisis in the Making or Radical Opportunity?

Tatiana Schreiber | November 24, 2013 | On the Farm

Jay Bailey, of Fair Winds Farm, in Brattleboro, applying diluted human urine to his hayfield using horses.

For many years environmental activists have used the term “peak oil” to refer to the coming crisis in availability of fossil fuels, and as part of a rhetorical strategy to hasten our shift toward a post-oil economy. Recently, some activists and scientists have begun to talk about another “peak” crisis: that of phosphorous.

Set the Table with Quince

Lindsay Arbuckle | November 24, 2013 | Set the Table

Quince

The first time I met a quince, I was immediately smitten. There were plenty of beautiful apples around, but that box of quince enticed me with its sweet, exotic aroma. Could I possibly describe the complex fragrance? Why hadn’t I seen or tasted one before?

Publishers' Note Winter 2014

| November 24, 2013 | Winter '14 | Issue twenty-seven

Ice harvesting circa 1903; Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

Coming in from a cold, bleak winter day into the warmth and bustle of a winter farmers’ market brings a certain elation and reminds us of the spirit of community and the life force still in all things at this darkest time of year. 

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What we do

Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape ties into larger questions of sustainability and the future of our food supply.