• Respecting Life, Accepting Death: Thoughts Regarding On-Farm Slaughter
  • Respecting Life, Accepting Death: Thoughts Regarding On-Farm Slaughter

    On a cold day in November, Malik’s car pulls up in our driveway. He and a companion, Papa, step out. . . We shake hands and exchange warm greetings. Malik asks after my husband and our two grown children. I ask Malik and Papa how their families are doing. We comment on the weather. Daylight is fading, however, and there’s work to do, so we head to the barn. 

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Articles tagged with: Sheep

Respecting Life, Accepting Death: Thoughts Regarding On-Farm Slaughter

Chris Sims | January 14, 2019 | Featured

Respecting Life, Accepting Death: Thoughts Regarding On-Farm Slaughter

On a cold day in November, Malik’s car pulls up in our driveway. He and a companion, Papa, step out. . . We shake hands and exchange warm greetings. Malik asks after my husband and our two grown children. I ask Malik and Papa how their families are doing. We comment on the weather. Daylight is fading, however, and there’s work to do, so we head to the barn. 

Vermont Preserves Unusual Breeds

Katie Sullivan | May 15, 2017 | Summer '17 | Issue forty-one

Gotland sheep

As the major breeds of animals in agriculture become ever more populous, farmers are increasingly aware of the genetic peril we face when we rely on just a few highly specialized breeds of a handful of species.

Last Morsel—A Slow Tan

Caroline Abels | February 10, 2016 | On the Farm

Sheepskin

Sheep aren’t raised for their skins, but the soft pelts that are a byproduct of meat and wool production are a fluffy reward for farmers and homesteaders who spend many hours tending their flocks.

The Shearer’s Daughter

Helen Whybrow | February 09, 2016 | Spring '16 | Issue thirty-six

Gwen shearing a sheep

During peak shearing seasons, Gwen often leaves her house at 4 a.m. and doesn’t return until after 10 p.m. Over those long days she might shear more than 100 sheep and drive several hundred miles, barely stopping for a meal. She estimates that annually she drives 40,000 miles and shears 8,000 to 10,000 sheep.

Sheep Dairies

Why aren’t there more in Vermont?

Katie Sullivan | August 25, 2015 | Fall '15 | Issue thirty-four

David Major’s flock at Vermont Shepherd

Vermont is famous for cow dairies, but as the market for artisanal cheese has boomed, goat and sheep milk cheeses have entered the mix. Over the past 20 years, a number of farmers have launched goat dairies for farmstead cheese and for fluid milk sales. Some are former cow operations that switched business models when cow milk prices plummeted. Others began with dairy goats from the start.

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