• Publishers' Note Fall 2017

    Publishers' Note Fall 2017

    As the days shorten and the temperatures begin their march south, here in Vermont we are so fortunate to experience Mother Nature’s annual display. It’s always been our favorite time of year; full of abundance from the summer and with a hint of the bittersweet knowledge that winter is next up on the docket.

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  • It’s Time for Puttin’ It Up

    It’s Time for Puttin’ It Up

    You may remember your mother or grandmother’s stories about “puttin’ up” tomatoes or green beans every summer.

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  • Set the Table with Bison

    Set the Table with Bison

    While the horned, haunched American bison usually evokes backdrops of western plains and peaks, it also inhabits the outskirts of humble Rutland, Vermont.

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  • People, Places, and Plates

    People, Places, and Plates

    You know how some buildings, even when they’re empty, seem as if their history is still alive, shimmering through the veil of the now? That’s how many people in Williamsville, Vermont, a bucolic community situated along Rock River, saw their old general store, sitting empty since 2007, after 185 years of continuous operation.

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  • Turn Summer’s Vegetables Into Winter’s Flavor Bombs

    Turn Summer’s Vegetables Into Winter’s Flavor Bombs

    If you garden or own a membership in a CSA, you know high summer through autumn as the time of year when everything explodes, and the piles of produce accumulating on kitchen counters, mudroom floors, erupting from crisper drawers, and occupying idle porch swings have begun to impede normal daily routine.

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  • Bringing Back the Local Grain Economy

    Bringing Back the Local Grain Economy

    Blair Marvin and Andrew Heyn of Elmore Mountain Bread have been baking together for 14 years. They’ve spent years researching and fine-tuning their recipes and processes to make the best bread possible—loaves that are full of taste yet equally full of nutrition.

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  • Farm-to-Fashion  in Sky Like Snow

    Farm-to-Fashion in Sky Like Snow

    “Farm to Table” is a familiar term—the distribution of goods from local farms to local communities that enables us to know where our food comes from and encourages the support of our producers. I hadn’t much entertained the idea of “Farm to Fashion,” hadn’t really considered the depth of the phrase, until I met fiber artist Hannah Regier at her home and studio in Athens, Vermont.

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  • Vermont Young Farmers Coalition

    Vermont Young Farmers Coalition

    Our state chapter, the Vermont Young Farmers Coalition (VYFC), engages both farm owners and employees who are putting down roots here. VYFC supports the national organization in their mission and projects, and engages with young farmers across Vermont, connecting them with fellow farmers and organizations.

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  • Stay Rooted in Vermont with Local Food

    Stay Rooted in Vermont with Local Food

    If you live in Vermont, chances are that at some time during the year you’ll be eating food that was either grown or processed (or both) in Vermont.

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  • Farmers' Kitchen—Singing River Farm’s Flint Corn Cornbread

    Farmers' Kitchen—Singing River Farm’s Flint Corn Cornbread

    As farmers, we try to hold a perspective that we are only the current stewards of land that has been, and will be, cared for by a continuum of people for millennia before and after us. Growing flint corn and saving its seed each year helps us maintain that perspective.

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  • The Mad Farmer, Flying the Flag of Rough Branch, Secedes from the Union

    The Mad Farmer, Flying the Flag of Rough Branch, Secedes from the Union

    From the union of power and money,
    From the union of power and secrecy,
    From the union of government and science,
    From the union of government and art,
    From the union of science and money,
    From the union of genius and war,
    From the union of outer space and inner vacuity,
    The Mad Farmer walks quietly away.

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Articles tagged with: Fall

Crafty Cultivation

A Burlington farmer invents machines that ease the burdens of farm labor

Written by Laura Sorkin | August 17, 2016

Rob using the prone weeder

The old adage says, “Necessity is the mother of invention,” but the small farmer’s credo would be a lot more specific: “A sore back will get you scheming for a better way.”

Bringing Back the Local Grain Economy

One Mill at a Time

Written by Pamela Hunt | August 16, 2017

Each millstone is hand shaped.

Blair Marvin and Andrew Heyn of Elmore Mountain Bread have been baking together for 14 years. They’ve spent years researching and fine-tuning their recipes and processes to make the best bread possible—loaves that are full of taste yet equally full of nutrition.

Über-Pastured Pork

Walter Jeffries pampers his pigs and tells the world about it on his popular blog

Written by Lauren Griswold | August 20, 2013

Pigs at Sugar Mountain Farm

There are 70 acres in West Topsham where about 400 pigs harvest their own kale (and garlic, when they’re feeling under the weather), go for rides in mini-vans, and bathe in mountain wallows. They’re about to stop that mini-van habit, but more on that later.

PYO Apples

| September 01, 2010

Vermont PYO Apples

What better fun on a cool fall day than to head out and pick your own apples! Here's a listing of orchards to visit.

Post Oil Solutions at Five Years

Organizing a Community-Based Regional Food System

Written by Tim Stevenson | September 01, 2010

2010 No Gardener Left Behind event at the River Garden, Brattleboro

A strong regional food system—one in which the people of a region are participating in their own food production in both sustaining and sustainable ways—is community based. As much as this system grows food, it grows people, encouraging relationships of collaboration and mutual aid, respect and care. No longer at war with nature and each other, unburdened by that ancient power relationship of us over them, and having given up the self-destructive effort to control life, people actively work with life in a community-based food system. In this way, they practice “relational agriculture,” building the social fabric that leads to a truly sustainable food system for all.

Farming & Feasting with the Robinsons: Autumn

Written by Jesse Natha | September 01, 2009

Sketch from the Rokeby collection of woman sorting apples

When autumn arrives in Vermont, it’s as if the searing heat of summer is absorbed by the maple trees and expressed through their blazing foliage. This signals the fiery death of another growing season, and the rapid retreat to winter’s dormancy. Ann Robinson Minturn remarked on this bittersweet transition in a letter to her husband, Lloyd, in September 1866: “The country never could be lovelier in September, I am sure, than during the present one—but it is always a melancholy month for me.”

Safe Ground

Written by Katie Ross | September 01, 2008

Smokey House Center; Natasha is third from left

Smokey House Center is not your run-of-the-mill farm by any means. And Natasha was the first to teach me this in no uncertain terms. A fight makes it sound too violent. A confrontation sounds too technical. I’d call it a challenge. My run-in with Natasha was definitely the first big challenge I faced as a crew leader at Smokey House. She was the first kid to test me, the first to stand her ground. I’m pretty sure she didn’t like me at first, and when Natasha doesn’t like you, you better watch out.

Farmers' Kitchen—Turkey Broth

Erin Bickford—Abenaki Springs Farm

| September 01, 2007

Turkey

Most people who eat the turkeys from our farm say they’re the best they’ve ever had. It must be all the sunshine and fresh air our birds get. Or perhaps it’s the buckwheat, oats, and clover we grow for them to forage in. Maybe it’s the grasshoppers they chase around. Whatever the case, something makes these turkeys really healthy and good.  Every hawk, eagle, fox, coyote, and owl in the area seems to want to jump every hurdle to get to them.

Making Peace with Plants

Making Peace with Plants

Written by Tatiana Schreiber | October 25, 2012

Goldenrod

I spent a recent morning clearing “alien” species out of one of my garden beds. By “alien” I don’t mean “non-native”; I just mean plants that I didn’t want in there, which is often what the word alien connotes: beings that don’t belong where they are.  I wanted an artistic arrangement of red and green shiso in that bed (shiso is a Japanese culinary herb—or weed, or medicinal plant, depending on your point of view—that grows wild in many parts of Asia).

Farmers' Kitchen—Zucchini Gone Wild

Written by Oliver Levis | August 22, 2014

Bonnie and Kate and the zucchini

Not many people would say zucchini is their favorite vegetable, but it’s an easy one to grow and it probably puts out more pounds of edible matter than any other plant in the garden.

Market Trends

How are Vermont’s farmers’ markets doing?

Written by Caroline Abels | August 25, 2015

Bellows Falls Farmers' Market

Over the past 10 years farmers’ markets in Vermont have burst forth like a backyard garden in July. Currently there are 63 markets in the Vermont Farmers’ Market Association, and a dozen or so that aren’t members. But every now and then you hear people wonder whether farmers’ markets have peaked in popularity, or strayed from their original purpose by offering more crafts and prepared foods.

Small Acts Bring Permaculture Out of the Backyard and into the Community

Written by Bonnie North | August 17, 2016

Bare root trees ready to plant

On August 28, 2011, when Tropical Storm Irene hit parts of Vermont with almost 10 inches of rain, the waters of the Saxtons River rose up in an uncontrollable torrent of historic proportions.

Farm-to-Fashion in Sky Like Snow

Written by Christine Cole Liz Guzynski | August 16, 2017

finished skeins ready for knitting

“Farm to Table” is a familiar term—the distribution of goods from local farms to local communities that enables us to know where our food comes from and encourages the support of our producers. I hadn’t much entertained the idea of “Farm to Fashion,” hadn’t really considered the depth of the phrase, until I met fiber artist Hannah Regier at her home and studio in Athens, Vermont.

Randall Cattle

Vermont’s Official State Heritage Breed

Written by Meg Lucas | August 20, 2013

Randall cattle grazing

At the beginning of the 20th century, as Halley’s Comet graced Vermont skies, Samuel Randall could be found tending a herd of lineback cattle on his farm in Sunderland, Vermont. The type of cattle he kept had fallen out of favor as farmers began selectively breeding for specific traits and standardization. But over decades—until the 1980s—and in virtual isolation, Samuel and his son Everett unknowingly preserved this “landrace” herd.

Farmers' Kitchen—Rabbit Revival

Written by David Robb and Lila Bennett | September 01, 2010

David Robb and Lila Bennett and family

Rabbits, they say, are the new chicken. They’re small, fast growing, feed efficiently, and are lower in fat and higher in protein than any other meat, yet you don’t see them much on Vermont farms. Why is that? The few rabbits raised in Vermont are literally out of sight, as in raised indoors, tightly caged and strictly dieted. That method didn’t suit our style of farming, so when we started with rabbits we raised them in chicken tractors, moving them to fresh grass twice daily. (Pasturing rabbits increases the omega fats in their meat.) But even though they were outdoors and on pasture, we still weren’t satisfied.

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A quarterly magazine devoted to covering local food, sustainable farming, and the many people building the Vermont food system.

Vermont's Local Banquet Magazine illuminates the connections between local food and Vermont communities. Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape is changing as the localvore movement shapes what is grown and raised here.

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