• Updated Website Address: LocalBanquet.org
  • Looking Back on a Decade of Maple Innovation
  • Listening to Farmers’ Voices in the Ecosystem Services Discussion
  • Updated Website Address: LocalBanquet.org

    We've changed our website. Please update your bookmarks to LocalBanquet.org LocalBanquet.org is where you will now find the latest Local Banquet stories, a new Story of the Day update feature, features from the archives, and information on how to contribute to Local Banquet if you're interested in writing about Vermont agriculture. 

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  • Looking Back on a Decade of Maple Innovation

    Back in 2007, Local Baquet ran an article by Bonnie Hudspeth on maple innovation and production in Vermont. Since then, maple production in Vermont has tripled to 1.8 million gallons a year and innovation seems to have entered a new golden (or perhaps amber) age. We did a quick maple innovation news round up for 2018 / 2019 to help everyone keep up with the some of the trends. 

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  • Listening to Farmers’ Voices in the Ecosystem Services Discussion

    In 2015, the USDA funded a project for UVM researchers to engage in discussions with Vermont farmers about the idea of being paid for ecosystem services. Ecosystem services are things farmers do that improve the environment for everyone, a common example is grass-based farms capturing carbon in the soil as a way to combat climate change. Some services happen naturally through sustainable farming, others take more of an incentive to implement, and either way some policy makers believe that farmers shoudl be compensated for their contribution. 

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Articles tagged with: Sheep

Respecting Life, Accepting Death: Thoughts Regarding On-Farm Slaughter

Chris Sims | January 14, 2019 | Winter 2019

Respecting Life, Accepting Death: Thoughts Regarding On-Farm Slaughter

On a cold day in November, Malik’s car pulls up in our driveway. He and a companion, Papa, step out. . . We shake hands and exchange warm greetings. Malik asks after my husband and our two grown children. I ask Malik and Papa how their families are doing. We comment on the weather. Daylight is fading, however, and there’s work to do, so we head to the barn. 

Vermont Preserves Unusual Breeds

Katie Sullivan | May 15, 2017 | Summer '17 | Issue forty-one

Gotland sheep

As the major breeds of animals in agriculture become ever more populous, farmers are increasingly aware of the genetic peril we face when we rely on just a few highly specialized breeds of a handful of species.

Last Morsel—A Slow Tan

Caroline Abels | February 10, 2016 | On the Farm

Sheepskin

Sheep aren’t raised for their skins, but the soft pelts that are a byproduct of meat and wool production are a fluffy reward for farmers and homesteaders who spend many hours tending their flocks.

The Shearer’s Daughter

Helen Whybrow | February 09, 2016 | Spring '16 | Issue thirty-six

Gwen shearing a sheep

During peak shearing seasons, Gwen often leaves her house at 4 a.m. and doesn’t return until after 10 p.m. Over those long days she might shear more than 100 sheep and drive several hundred miles, barely stopping for a meal. She estimates that annually she drives 40,000 miles and shears 8,000 to 10,000 sheep.

Sheep Dairies

Why aren’t there more in Vermont?

Katie Sullivan | August 25, 2015 | Fall '15 | Issue thirty-four

David Major’s flock at Vermont Shepherd

Vermont is famous for cow dairies, but as the market for artisanal cheese has boomed, goat and sheep milk cheeses have entered the mix. Over the past 20 years, a number of farmers have launched goat dairies for farmstead cheese and for fluid milk sales. Some are former cow operations that switched business models when cow milk prices plummeted. Others began with dairy goats from the start.

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What we do

Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape ties into larger questions of sustainability and the future of our food supply.