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Summer '17 | Issue forty-one

Last Morsel—When Worlds Collide

How does a liberal arts education affect life on the farm?

| May 15, 2017 |

Grazing sheep

I butchered three sheep today. What does this mean to me as a man educated in liberal arts at Middlebury?

How To Be a Knife Ninja

Elena Gustavson | May 15, 2017 |

Elena Gustavson, Bethany Yon, Nicole LeBlond

“How many here are knife ninjas?” After a pause, two or three hands creep up in the small crowd of flannel- and Carhart-clad students. This group from Green Mountain College is a bit shy, but definitely interested. “Great! How about you?”

Q & A with Lt. Governor David Zuckerman

Suzanne Podhaizer | May 15, 2017 | Summer '17 | Issue forty-one

Vermont State House

David Zuckerman is the 81st lieutenant governor of Vermont, and is the first member of the Vermont Progressive Party to hold a statewide office. He is also a farmer.

Vermont Preserves Unusual Breeds

Katie Sullivan | May 15, 2017 | Summer '17 | Issue forty-one

Gotland sheep

As the major breeds of animals in agriculture become ever more populous, farmers are increasingly aware of the genetic peril we face when we rely on just a few highly specialized breeds of a handful of species.

All Souls Tortilleria

Spurs the Search for a Short-season White Heirloom Corn

Jesse Natha | May 15, 2017 | Summer '17 | Issue forty-one

Sam Fuller, Joe Bossen, and Hubert d’Autremont

On one wall of All Souls Tortilleria, a whiteboard is filled with the week’s open orders. Fresh-that-day masa; tortillas for Burlington’s El Cortijo and City Market; Mad Taco in Waitsfield and Montpelier; and bulk masa for Gracie’s Tamales of Waitsfield are among the list of regular accounts.

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What we do

Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape ties into larger questions of sustainability and the future of our food supply.