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Shares

Summer '16 | Issue thirty-seven

Sharing the Whole Earth Perspective

Organic farmers in the WWOOF program pass down the values of the local food movement

Amber Newman | May 25, 2016 | Summer '16 | Issue thirty-seven

Jovin Ehrt, James Daly, and Meg Kirkham harvesting flint corn at Singing River Farm

Singing River Farm in Rockingham belongs to a global network of organic farmers who welcome strangers into their lives for an educational and cultural exchange. The network, World Wide Opportunities on Organic Farms, is better known as WWOOF, and the people who visit farms are known as WWOOF’ers.

Pigs and Whey: “It just makes sense.”

Caitlin Gildrien | May 25, 2016 | Summer '16 | Issue thirty-seven

Whey fed pigs

“When people tell me they’re thinking about getting into cheese, I tell them to get pigs.” Mateo Kehler of Greensboro’s Jasper Hill Farm pauses. “In fact, I wish we’d gotten pigs before we got cows.”

Set the Table with…Crickets

Pamela Hunt | May 25, 2016 | Summer '16 | Issue thirty-seven

Table with baked goods

Like many new fathers, Stephen Swanson wanted to do something to make his children’s world a better place. After reading a 2013 report by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization about the health and environmental benefits of eating insects, he told his wife, Jen, that he wanted to start a cricket farm in their Williston garage.

Grow Where You Work

Charlie Nardozzi | May 25, 2016 | Summer '16 | Issue thirty-seven

Northeast Kingdom Community Action – Barton

Across the country, employees are realizing the benefits of gardening where they work. And as company wellness programs proliferate, employers are looking for creative ways to engage their staff.

Publishers' Note—Summer 2016

| May 24, 2016 | Summer '16 | Issue thirty-seven

Publishers' Note—Summer 2016

Vermont has a long history of leading the nation in enacting principled laws aimed at promoting the common good.

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What we do

Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape ties into larger questions of sustainability and the future of our food supply.