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Summer '11 | Issue seventeen

Summer Cartoon—Post Peak Oil

Leah Wittenberg | June 01, 2011 | 2011

Scenes we'd like to see: Post Peak Oil

Scenes we'd like to see: Post Peak Oil

One Wild Potluck

Diane Grenkow | June 01, 2011 | 2011

Rhus typhina L. (staghorn sumac)

The Peterson Field Guide Edible Wild Plants has a recipe for clovers that says clovers are not very digestible but can be soaked for hours in salty water to make them so. Christopher Nyerges book Guide to Wild Foods and Useful Plants tells you that the seeds of the plantain, a common weed around these parts, can be soaked in water until soft and then cooked up like rice. It goes on to say that the result is slightly “mucilaginous and bland.”

Micro Milk

A South Royalton company envisions a rebirth of Vermont dairy through small-scale pasteurization

Sylvia Fagin | June 01, 2011 | On the Farm

Bob-White’s low-impact, small-scale pasteurizer

Local food and slow food frequently mean small food: small farms, small producers, small quantities. The English language happens to provide a nice term for very small: micro. So it follows that the antidote to a huge, consolidated milk production system might be a micro dairy.

After the Fire

Destruction, adjustment, and renewal at Pete’s Greens

Julia Shipley | June 01, 2011 | 2011

Pete’s barn, January 12, 2011

Barn’s burnt down…now I can see the moon. –Chinese proverb

Yet the converse is also true: Yes, we can see the moon, but it won’t shelter tractors, nor can vegetables be washed, packed, and stored inside its lovely glow. Oh, the moon is beautiful, but what can it do for food and a business after the fire is put out?

Set the Table with Hot Sauce

Claire Fitts Georges | June 01, 2011 | 2011

Hot Peppers

Vermont is known for many things, but spicy food is not one of them. Fortunately for the spice lovers among us, many local farmers have bucked the trend and have been cultivating delicious, spicy chilis for us to enjoy. Hot peppers need heat to grow, but with a good dose of sunlight and perhaps some black plastic over the soil, peppers can thrive in Vermont’s warm summers.

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What we do

Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape ties into larger questions of sustainability and the future of our food supply.