0
Shares

Commentary

One Wild Potluck

Written by Diane Grenkow | June 01, 2011

Rhus typhina L. (staghorn sumac)

The Peterson Field Guide Edible Wild Plants has a recipe for clovers that says clovers are not very digestible but can be soaked for hours in salty water to make them so. Christopher Nyerges book Guide to Wild Foods and Useful Plants tells you that the seeds of the plantain, a common weed around these parts, can be soaked in water until soft and then cooked up like rice. It goes on to say that the result is slightly “mucilaginous and bland.”

Last Morsel—The Taste

| March 01, 2008

Joyce's pigs

I roasted a loin roast from one of the pigs I’d raised—dinner plans had been canceled because of the ice storm.

Delivering Awe

Written by Lauren Griswold | October 25, 2012

Kidding Eat Stay Farm

When I arrived at Green Mountain Girls Farm in April for a yearlong apprenticeship, one of the many animals I met was Tacamba, a stocky but relatively skittish Boer goat, new to the farm. She was markedly more uncomfortable with us two-leggeds than her herd mates were, so Mari and Laura, farmers-in-chief, had spent some extra time socializing her with human interaction, hand-feeding her alfalfa cubes and petting her when she would let them.

Last Morsel—Winter Apples

Written by Susan Futrell | December 01, 2008

Photo by Jane Booth. Photograph made at Scott Farm, a Landmark Trust USA property.

Pruning in winter is about learning to see what you can’t see. Buds still dormant. Leaves and branches yet to appear. Angles of sun and shadow that change daily. Invisible apples. On a piercing blue-sky day last February, I followed Zeke Goodband, master orchardist at historic Scott Farm in Dummerston, as he walked among the apple trees that arched over the rolling hills of the orchard. I’ve asked him to teach me about pruning.

Appreciating Neighbors

Written by Mari Omland and Laura Olsen | February 22, 2017

Photo courtesy of Green Mountian Girls

“Neighbor” and “community” are two words that show up frequently in our weekly farm blog.

Last Morsel—When Worlds Collide

How does a liberal arts education affect life on the farm?

| May 15, 2017

Grazing sheep

I butchered three sheep today. What does this mean to me as a man educated in liberal arts at Middlebury?

Last Morsel—Jr. Iron Chef

| June 01, 2008

Jr. Iron Chef Competition

If you had walked into the Champlain Valley Exposition in Essex Junction on April 12, you would have seen dozens of teenagers from around Vermont having fun with... sprouts. And root vegetables. And wheat berries. And winter squash.

The Other Great Flood

| December 01, 2011

Canoeing toward a farmhouse in Bolton, 1927

When the 1927 flood hit, devastating damage occurred on Vermont farms, primarily losses of livestock and barns. And yet the same spirit of cooperation evident after Irene was very present back then, as illustrated by the flyer at right, which could have been written today.

Mark Kurlansky's "The Food of a Younger Land"

The Eating Habits of Americans (from the 1930s WPA chronicles)

| December 01, 2012

Photos from the Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division.

In the 1930s, writers for the Works Progress Administration (WPA) chronicled the eating habits of Americans. Here are some Vermont excerpts, as collected in Mark Kurlansky’s The Food of a Younger Land:

Inviting the Pollinators

Written by Tatiana Schreiber | January 01, 2013

Illustration by Constance M. Foot from Insect Wonderland, 1910. Courtesy of OldBookArt.com

Several years ago I was privileged to spend weeks and months at a time working in southern Mexico with organic coffee and cacao farmers. My first visit to a coffee farm is etched in my memory primarily through sound—the sound of bees.

My Family’s French Canadian Kitchen

A petite vegetable farm in Saint Armand shares lessons in profitability.

Written by Dorothy Read | November 15, 2016

tourtière

Whenever I catch a whiff of cinnamon or cloves, my mind drifts to my mother’s kitchen and the French Canadian food traditions that shaped how I learned to cook.

<<  1 2 [3

What we do

A quarterly magazine devoted to covering local food, sustainable farming, and the many people building the Vermont food system.

Vermont's Local Banquet Magazine illuminates the connections between local food and Vermont communities. Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape is changing as the localvore movement shapes what is grown and raised here.

Connect

Sign up for quarterly notifications and issue highlights.
Please wait