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Publishers' Note Summer 2014

| May 23, 2014

Rice plants

We’re turning 7 this summer! It’s amazing to think that Local Banquet has had the privilege of chronicling the local and sustainable food movement here in the state as it has grown up. Of course we owe a tremendous amount to the folks who, in the 1970s, came to Vermont to start the work and give us a solid foundation: knowledge passed from one generation to the next.

Editor's Note Fall 2014

Written by Caroline Abels | August 21, 2014

Mrs. Alice White at the Victory Store vegetable counter in Hardwick, 1942

Recently I was at a potluck put on by Slow Food Vermont, chatting with a local homesteader about food and ag, and I ended up telling her:
“I’m not a foodie—I’m a farmie.”

Publishers' Note Winter 2015

| November 16, 2014

Mr. G.W. Clarke coming to town to sell butter on a Saturday in the winter of 1939, Woodstock, Vermont.

They’ve already started to arrive in the mailbox: seed catalogs, with their glorious photos and wonderful illustrations, calling to us, announcing the promise of a future garden—and of spring. We’re in!

Editor's Note Spring 2015

| February 11, 2015

Tapping maple trees

When Paul McCartney popped up on my computer screen recently, I wanted to believe him. Who wouldn’t be prepared to trust a man who wrote and sang “Blackbird” and “Good Day Sunshine” and “Penny Lane”?

Publishers' Note

Written by Meg Lucas | May 26, 2015

Anise hyssop

When they harnessed fire, by some accounts more than 1.5 million years ago, our distant ancestors changed the course of their evolution and, ultimately, ours. Not only was light and warmth brought into their lives, but the act of cooking food is thought to have increased brain size and put us on the path to becoming Homo Sapiens.

Editor's Note Fall 2015

Written by Caroline Abels | August 19, 2015

Dairy farmer picking up potatoes on his farm near Fairfield, Vermont, September 1941.

I’m writing this in early August, on the heels of Vermont Open Farm Week—seven days during which 75 farms, orchards, vineyards, distilleries, and nurseries opened their doors to the public for a concentrated week of public outreach.

Publishers' Note—Winter 2016

| November 24, 2015

Work That Educates, 1914; photo by Lewis Wickes Hine, 1874–1940, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, DC.

We think a lot about food here at Local Banquet. How it’s grown and who’s growing it and the practices that enhance and sustain our planet.

Editor's Note Spring 2016

| February 09, 2016

The Robinsons' dog Trump enjoys the apple orchard in bloom.

Last fall I was an intern on a Vermont sheep and fruit farm, and over the course of three weeks I used parts of my brain that I tap so rarely they might as well be located in my elbow. Normally I spend my days as a writer and editor, working with words, and like most of us I don’t tax my thinking beyond what my chosen line of work asks of me. My brain is narrow. It is used to doing one or two things well.

Publishers' Note—Summer 2016

| May 24, 2016

Publishers' Note—Summer 2016

Vermont has a long history of leading the nation in enacting principled laws aimed at promoting the common good.

Publishers' Note—Fall 2016

| August 17, 2016

Publishers' Note—Fall 2016

For the past several years now, we’ve composted our garden and kitchen scraps. With increased success, we’ve watched apple cores and tomato vines metamorphose into a rich, dark, crumbly hummus.

Editor's Note Winter 2017

Written by Caroline Abels | November 14, 2016

Customs and Immigration border inspection station at Morses Line, Vermont, 1940; photo courtesy of Department Of Homeland Security

“If you’re going to Québec City, you have to visit a cabane à sucre,” said Claire. And her good advice was confirmed as soon as my partner and I walked into Cabane à Sucre Leclerc in Neuville on a chilly, snowy evening.

Publishers' Note Summer 2013

| July 03, 2013

Boys with fish, 1949; photo courtesy of the Vermont State Archives and Records Administration.

According to a 2009 report prepared by the Lake Champlain Fish and Wildlife Management Cooperative, the earliest published account of fish in Lake Champlain was by Zadock Thompson in his Natural History of Vermont (1853). In his report, Thompson described 48 different species of fish, and historically, the commercial fisheries on the lake targeted whitefish, walleye, yellow perch, lake sturgeon, eel, and lake trout.

Publishers' Note Spring 2013

| March 01, 2013

Whiskey Barrel

Maybe you’ve noticed that the “spirits” of Vermont are on the move and showing up at liquor outlets, farmers’ markets, restaurants—even your friends’ homes—throughout the state. Are they friendly spirits, you ask? You bet! As with local food, Vermont is quickly becoming a state with a flourishing locally distilled spirits industry.

Publishers' Note Summer 2008

| June 01, 2008

Jars of pickles

As the weather warms here in Vermont, we get to experience the promise of another growing season. But many people in our communities struggle with food security, unable to get access to Vermont’s amazing bounty. Summer is a good time to think of these community members. Here are some ways that we can make a difference.

Publishers' Note Fall 2010

| September 01, 2010

scarecrow

When we think of what a traditional Thanksgiving might have looked like, many of us may conjure up images of Pilgrims and Native Americans sitting around a communal table enjoying a shared harvest meal. We’re not sure who fabricated this idealized scenario, but even though it lingers with us to this day, its likelihood is doubtful. Actually, it was Abraham Lincoln who declared Thanksgiving a national holiday in 1863, as a way to raise people’s spirits during the long Civil War.

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What we do

A quarterly magazine devoted to covering local food, sustainable farming, and the many people building the Vermont food system.

Vermont's Local Banquet Magazine illuminates the connections between local food and Vermont communities. Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape is changing as the localvore movement shapes what is grown and raised here.

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