0
Shares

Three Square—Spring 2008

Denny Partridge | March 01, 2008 | Issues Archive

Place setting

Growing up in Vermont, I ate chokecherries, dandelions, venison, and tempura day lilies. When I returned recently, to live here full-time, I began to notice how often the conversation in Vermont turns to food. What’s for dinner? For the next few issues of Local Banquet, I’ll visit a variety of people at home, peer into their iceboxes, and find out what they’re eating and why. And because these can often be personal subjects, I’ve omitted last names.

Susan is chopping an enormous white radish. “You’re in the store and you think, why the hell would anyone buy this?”

Zack Woods Herb Farm

Filling Vermonters’ Medicine Cabinets

Rhiannon Hutchinson | March 01, 2008 | On the Farm

Jeff Carpenter and Melanie Slick Carpenter

The growing demand for locally-sourced products in Vermont is leading residents to look beyond vegetables and meat to another important item for consumption: herbs. As a result, herb farms such as Zack Woods Herb Farm in Hyde Park, founded in 1999 by Jeff Carpenter and his wife, Melanie Slick Carpenter, are enjoying amazing success as Vermonters seek out local herbs not just for inclusion in homemade meals but for medicinal use as well. At Zack Woods, 35 medicinal herbs are grown for a host of ailments, and the Carpenters are working hard to keep up with demand.

Farmers' Kitchen—Better Be Beets

Lisa MacDougall—Mighty Food Farm

| December 01, 2007 | Farmers' Kitchen

Lisa MacDougall

Beets are one of the mightiest of all vegetables. Steamed, roasted, pickled, or raw, beets add color, flavor, and nutrition to any meal.

Survival of the Rawest

Roberto Gautier | December 01, 2007 | Issues Archive

Peter Dixon

Sometimes the food world offers bona fide drama made for “reality” TV. Survival of the Rawest is the working title for my imagined submission to the networks. This virtual “hit-show” is actually in production right now on small farms in the Northeast. And the subject is the clash of live foods with dead ones.

RAFFL, Loca, and Raw Milk Legislation

Caroline Abels | December 01, 2007 | Issues Archive

Sign for raw mikh cheese at farmers' market

Raw milk cheeses aren’t the only “live” foods getting attention in Vermont these days. In January, Rural Vermont, a non-profit working for economic justice for Vermont farmers, plans to introduce legislation in the Statehouse that would enable farmers to sell more than 24 quarts of raw milk a day.

<<  111 112 113 114 115 [116117 118 119 120  >>  

What we do

Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape ties into larger questions of sustainability and the future of our food supply.