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Last Morsel—The Taste

| March 01, 2008 | Issues Archive

Joyce's pigs

I roasted a loin roast from one of the pigs I’d raised—dinner plans had been canceled because of the ice storm.

Farmers' Kitchen—Try a Little Tenderness

Judy Sopenski—Not Your Ordinary Farm

| March 01, 2008 | Farmers' Kitchen

Judy Sopenski

There are some meals that spell COMFORT to all who eat them. Leave your teeth behind. Savor the smell and the melting texture. Give yourself over to a sensuous repast.

Writing Down the Farm

Elizabeth Ferry | March 01, 2008 | Issues Archive

original letter from katrina

The logic is straightforward and simple. It goes like this: Farming is the one business that everyone needs, because everyone eats. Add to it the fact that children grow up—often faster than adults can imagine. And when Vermont children become adults, they may want to become part of the local food system, either as a farmer or an eater.

Cooking the Sting Out

Meg Lucas | March 01, 2008 | Issues Archive

Illustration of Nettle plant

If you take care, and wear the proper gear, you can harvest an abundant and fascinating wild edible. Folks who have been stung by this rascal know what I’m talking about, while those who haven’t had the pleasure of eating it will undoubtedly come to appreciate this nutritious and tasty plant.

A Missing Link in the Local Food Chain

Bill Fosher | March 01, 2008 | Food Systems & Policy

Flock of sheep

In good weather, the drive between southwestern New Hampshire and the Capital District of New York state can be breathtakingly beautiful: there’s the view from Hogback Mountain, the wind farm in Searsburg, the Bennington obelisk. But at 4 a.m. during a December snow storm, while pulling a trailer loaded with lambs over a foggy two-lane road, the drive is tedious at best and can be downright hairy.

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What we do

Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape ties into larger questions of sustainability and the future of our food supply.