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Spring '15 | Issue thirty-two

The Taste of Grass

How farmers are improving the flavor of grass-fed beef, with fat

| February 13, 2015 | Spring '15 | Issue thirty-two

Cattle grazing on grass

Fat tastes good. Whatever your other feelings about fat and health, good fats and bad fats, let’s agree that fat improves a food’s flavor. Our salivary glands respond to fat’s aromas during cooking (think frying bacon or browning butter) and its presence changes the way food feels on our tongue, adding a satisfyingly rich texture.

The Seeds of Renewal Project

Renewing Abenaki agriculture, one seed at a time

Fred Wiseman | February 12, 2015 | Spring '15 | Issue thirty-two

The Koasek Abenaki Sun Dancer at the 2014 Harvest Celebration, Piermont, NH.

Back in the 1950s and 60s, I often visited my grandparents in northwestern Vermont during the summers. I remember children and teenagers enthusiastically riding their bikes with bucket and spinning rod, heading down to the Missisquoi River to fish.

Spring Vinegars

Herbal Infusions for Health and Flavor

Juliette Abigail Carr | February 11, 2015 | Spring '15 | Issue thirty-two

dandelion, chickweed, burdock, and nettles

As the earth reawakens from winter’s slumber, it takes time for the sun’s warmth to turn the earth over to spring, coaxing new growth out of last year’s seed. The same is true in our bodies: It takes time to transition from the inwardness of winter to spring’s explosion of vitality.

Set the Table with Cultured Foods

Leda Scheintaub | February 11, 2015 | Spring '15 | Issue thirty-two

Pickled turnips

Introducing bold-flavored ferments—from the spicy kick of kimchi to the sour tang of kefir and the refreshing effervescence of kombucha and beyond—into your culinary repertoire opens a new world of taste sensations. Fermentation becomes a happy compulsion.

Editor's Note Spring 2015

| February 11, 2015 | Spring '15 | Issue thirty-two

Tapping maple trees

When Paul McCartney popped up on my computer screen recently, I wanted to believe him. Who wouldn’t be prepared to trust a man who wrote and sang “Blackbird” and “Good Day Sunshine” and “Penny Lane”?

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What we do

Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape ties into larger questions of sustainability and the future of our food supply.