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Spring '08 | Issue four

Editor's Note Spring 2008

Caroline Abels | March 01, 2008 | 2008

bird house

The word ‘chores’ is spoken often in New England’s farming community, but people who work outside the agricultural sector don’t use it much. Last time many of us heard the word was when our mother told us to go do our chores–or no allowance! Nowadays, we ‘run errands’ and ‘go to work,’ reflecting our estrangement from manual labor. We certainly have as much to do as farmers, especially if we’re parents or are working two jobs to make ends meet; all of us are busy in our own way. It’s just that farmers rarely get a day off.

Last Morsel—The Taste

| March 01, 2008 | Issues Archive

Joyce's pigs

I roasted a loin roast from one of the pigs I’d raised—dinner plans had been canceled because of the ice storm.

Farmers' Kitchen—Try a Little Tenderness

Judy Sopenski—Not Your Ordinary Farm

| March 01, 2008 | Farmers' Kitchen

Judy Sopenski

There are some meals that spell COMFORT to all who eat them. Leave your teeth behind. Savor the smell and the melting texture. Give yourself over to a sensuous repast.

Writing Down the Farm

Elizabeth Ferry | March 01, 2008 | Issues Archive

original letter from katrina

The logic is straightforward and simple. It goes like this: Farming is the one business that everyone needs, because everyone eats. Add to it the fact that children grow up—often faster than adults can imagine. And when Vermont children become adults, they may want to become part of the local food system, either as a farmer or an eater.

Cooking the Sting Out

Meg Lucas | March 01, 2008 | Issues Archive

Illustration of Nettle plant

If you take care, and wear the proper gear, you can harvest an abundant and fascinating wild edible. Folks who have been stung by this rascal know what I’m talking about, while those who haven’t had the pleasure of eating it will undoubtedly come to appreciate this nutritious and tasty plant.

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What we do

Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape ties into larger questions of sustainability and the future of our food supply.