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Recipes tagged with: savory

  • Time: 30 minutes prep; 20 minutes on stove
  • Complexity: easy

Vegetable Stew with Okra

Vegetable Stew with Okra

One of our “go-to” okra recipes to prepare in September (when we have a little more time) is a vegetable “gumbo.” We sauté onions and garlic, then add okra, zucchini, tomatoes, hot pepper, and sometimes eggplant. We season this with fresh basil, parsley, and oregano. Make a big batch and, after eating your fill, freeze the rest up for some mid-winter veggie therapy!

  • Time: 30 minutes prep
  • Complexity: easy

Simple Crock-Pot Rabbit

Rabbit Stew

“My favorite way of cooking rabbit is to simmer it slowly with onions, celery, and seasonings,” Robin Schunk of New Discovery Farm says. “Then I pick the meat off the bone and use it for chili and quesadillas.”

After searching out a rabbit recipe for myself, I put together this using Robin’s favorite seasonings.

 
  • Time: 30 minutes prep
  • Complexity: easy

Prosciutto-Wrapped Pickled Asparagus

Prosciutto-Wrapped Pickled Asparagus

This is the perfect make-ahead party food: Have your pickled asparagus spears on hand and it takes just minutes to wrap them, rewarding you with an elegant presentation and a salty, tangy take on the classic app.

© Cultured Foods for Your Kitchen: 100 Recipes Featuring the Bold Flavors of Fermentation by Leda Scheintaub, Rizzoli New York, 2014

 
  • Time: 5–6 hours
  • Complexity: easy

Roasted Pork Shoulder

roast pork shoulder

I love cooking pork, but I’m not going to give you much of a recipe here. As a finished product, what you’ll get from this is a pile of pork that is salty and delicious. You can turn it into pulled pork, Bo Ssäm, some Italian gravy, or hundreds of other dishes. That part will be up to you.

In New England, these are often cut and called a Boston butt. Ours are bone-in with a nice fat cap on them, but this recipe can be made with a boneless piece or a picnic ham (fresh, not smoked). As long as you have a big piece of meat from the shoulder, it’ll be fine.

  • Time: 5 minutes prep
  • Complexity: easy

Spring Cider Vinaigrette

cider vinaigrette

Tweak to suit your taste and enjoy. Makes a nice marinade, too.

  • Time: 30 minutes prep
  • Complexity: easy

Spring Vinegar

jars of vinegar

Feel free to substitute other herbs and adjust the amounts as you see fit. The longer your vinegar infuses, the stronger it will be. You can start using it after about a week, but I recommend letting it brew for at least a month to develop the flavor. I put one jar aside every spring for next spring, when it packs a powerful punch.

To strain, pour through a mesh strainer or cheesecloth into a clean jar. Squeeze out the last, strongest goodness from the plant matter before discarding.

Label and store in a cool, dark place. It has a shelf life of forever.

  • Time: 30 minutes prep
  • Complexity: easy

Pink Pickled Baby Turnip Carpaccio

Pink Pickled Baby Turnip Carpaccio

While winter turnips typically make their way into cold-weather soups and stews, small, delicate baby turnips are among the first early-season roots that lend themselves to pickling. For this dish I thinly slice the turnip pickles to reveal their rose-petal-pink interior and elegantly arrange them on plates so they can be properly admired before digging in.

© Cultured Foods for Your Kitchen: 100 Recipes Featuring the Bold Flavors of Fermentation by Leda Scheintaub, Rizzoli New York, 2014

 
  • Time: 20 minutes prep
  • Complexity: easy

Mama Ganoush (or Move Over, Baba)

Mama Ganoush

For our “Mama Ganoush” we start by roasting all of the overgrown zucchini we can rustle up. Keep the mixture cold and enjoy this summer treat. It’s up to you if you want to tell your friends that it’s not made with eggplant.

 
  • Time: 20 minutes prep
  • Complexity: medium

Mutton Gyros

Mutton Gyros

Supporting mutton will expand your culinary reaches while saving you money. It will also add a revenue stream to the balance sheets of local sheep farmers, making their enterprises more competitive and sustainable. Mutton may be a vanishingly small piece of the culinary landscape of Vermont now, but a few people expressing interest in mutton by talking to a sheep farmer at the farmers’ market or calling a few nearby sheep farms could start the ball rolling.

 
  • Time: 10 minutes prep; cooking time 30 minutes
  • Complexity: easy

Simple Spring Pasta with Dandelion Greens

Simple Spring Pasta with Dandelion Greens

Original recipe by Helen Labun Jordan. If you have the time homemade pasta enhances this dish.

 
  • Time: 10 minutes prep; bake 30 minutes
  • Complexity: easy

Vinegar Reduction Sauce

Vinegar Reduction Sauce

Nick Cowles of Shelburne Orchards says, “This is best with pork tenderloin or boneless pork chops. Yay, meat!”

 
  • Time: 30 minutes prep; bake 30 minutes
  • Complexity: medium

Stuffed Quince

Quince

Quince originated in the Caucasus region of Europe and predates apple cultivation. It may even have been the fruit of temptation in the Garden of Eden. To honor this, I adapted a recipe fromJerusalem: A Cookbook, by Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi (2012).

  • Time: 30 minutes prep; slow cook 4–5 hours
  • Complexity: medium

Pot Roast with Tomatoes, Cinnamon, and Allspice

Pot Roast

Here’s a favorite grass-fed beef recipe for a busy after-school meal. I love using my crock pot for it! Adapted from Deborah Krasner’s Good Meat: The Complete Guide to Sourcing and Cooking Sustainable Meat (Stewart, Tabori & Chang, 2010).

  • Time: 30 minutes prep; 90 bake minutes
  • Complexity: medium

Beer-Can Chicken

Beer Can Chicken

Use your favorite homemade or store-bought spice rub for this chicken and use whatever convenient non-soda drink that comes in a can (I like juices). The important part about the beer can is the can and the liquid, not so much the beer. Original recipe by Claire Fitts.

  • Time: 30 minutes prep; 30 bake minutes
  • Complexity: medium

Cornbread Casserole

Cornbread Casserole

Sausage is a tasty step up from hamburger. It is plenty versatile and usually reasonably priced. Recently I was standing in a local food co-op eyeing some particularly tasty-looking local cornmeal and trying to figure out how to work it into me and my man’s dinner plans; we also needed a dish that would make some leftover lunches. Original recipe by Claire Fitts.

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