• Ceres, Goddess of Agriculture, Returns to State House
  • Heritage Ciders from Tannic Apples: New England’s OG Wine
  • Local Wineries & Cider Makers Tackle Food Waste with Collaboration
  • Ceres, Goddess of Agriculture, Returns to State House

    Agriculture has regained its place of pride in the Vermont state house as the new Ceres sculpture was lifted into place on November 30th. This version, made by local artists Chris Miller and Jerry Williams, is expected to reside on the golden dome for 150 years. 

    Read more

  • Heritage Ciders from Tannic Apples: New England’s OG Wine

    Your favorite apples from the grocery store don’t have much in the way of tannin, and they make an alcoholic cider that New Englanders from the Founding Fathers time would have scorned - cider was once the wine of the Northeast, and today heritage ciders are bringing back that tradition. 

    Read more

  • Local Wineries & Cider Makers Tackle Food Waste with Collaboration

    The crispness of fall has given way to chillier nights and snow dusted mornings throughout much of Vermont. It’s the season to tuck in with a glass of local wine or cider in hand. As you sip slowly, here's some food (or drink) for thought: what happens to the waste produced in the creation of your beverage? Where does that spent grape must and pomace go, aside from the compost bin?

    Read more

0
Shares

The Mad Farmer, Flying the Flag of Rough Branch, Secedes from the Union

The Mad Farmer, Flying the Flag of Rough Branch, Secedes from the Union
Woodcut by Jerry Dadds

Written By

Wendell Berry

Written on

August 16 , 2017

From the union of power and money,
From the union of power and secrecy,
From the union of government and science,
From the union of government and art,
From the union of science and money,
From the union of genius and war,
From the union of outer space and inner vacuity,
The Mad Farmer walks quietly away.

There is only one of him, but he goes.
He returns to the small country he calls home,
His own nation small enough to walk across.
He goes shadowy into the local woods,
And brightly into the local meadows and croplands.
He goes to the care of neighbors,
He goes into the care of neighbors.
He goes to the potluck supper, a dish
From each house for the hunger of every house.
He goes into the quiet of early mornings
Of days when he is not going anywhere.

Calling his neighbors together into the sanctity
Of their lives separate and together,
In the one life of the commonwealth and home,
In their own nation small enough for a story
Or song to travel across in an hour, he cries:
Come all ye conservatives and liberals
Who want to conserve the good things and be free,

Come away from the merchants of big answers,
Whose hands are metalled with power;
From the union of anywhere and everywhere;
By the purchase of everything from everybody at the lowest price
And the sale of anything to anybody at the highest price;
From the union of work and debt, work and despair;
From the wage-slavery of the helplessly well-employed.

From the union of self-gratification and self-annihilation,
Secede into the care for one another
And for the good gifts of Heaven and Earth.

Come into the life of the body, the one body
Granted to you in all the history of time.
Come into the body’s economy, its daily work,
And its replenishment at mealtimes and at night.
Come into the body’s thanksgiving, when it knows
And acknowledges itself a living soul.
Come into the dance of the community, joined
In a circle, hand in hand, the dance of the eternal
Love of women and men for one another
And of neighbors and friends for one another.

Always disappearing, always returning,
Calling his neighbors to return, to think again
Of the care of flocks and herds, of gardens
And fields, of woodlots and forests and the uncut groves,
Calling them separately and together, calling and calling,
He goes forever toward the long restful evening
And the croak of the night heron over the river at dark.

 

Credit: Copyright © 2012 by Wendell Berry, from New Collected Poems. Reprint by permission of Counterpoint.

No video selected.

About the Author

Wendell Berry

Wendell Berry

Wendell Erdman Berry is an American novelist, poet, environmental activist, cultural critic, and farmer. A prolific author, he has written many novels, short stories, poems, and essays.

Leave a comment

You are commenting as guest. Optional login below.

What we do

Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape ties into larger questions of sustainability and the future of our food supply. 

Subscribe to Our Newsletter

Sign up here to receive monthly Local Banquet news in your inbox.