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Sylvia’s Spiced Butternut Bread

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Sylvia’s Spiced Butternut Bread

This recipe makes one large loaf, but for a special occasion, it doubles nicely. If you can’t find butternuts, substitute black walnuts or any favorite nut. You can also use a mixture of different nuts.

Ingredients

  • 1½ cups butternuts, coarsely chopped
  • 2 cups all-purpose or white, whole-wheat flour
  • ¾ teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ cup light brown sugar
  • ½ cup white sugar
  • large pinch of salt
  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon ground ginger
  • ¼ teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1 cup buttermilk
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 2 tablespoon walnut or canola oil

Directions

This recipe makes one large loaf, but for a special occasion, it doubles nicely. If you can’t find butternuts, substitute black walnuts or any favorite nut. You can also use a mixture of different nuts. I usually use white, whole-wheat flour, but all-purpose is fine too. I also have made this with a gluten-free baking mix and it came out quite well. If you don’t have buttermilk, sour regular milk with a teaspoon of vinegar. This acid is needed for the baking soda to work.

Preheat oven to 350 °F and grease and flour a loaf pan.

In a dry skillet, over medium-high heat, toast the nuts, shaking the pan continually, and keeping an eye on it. When you start to smell the fragrance of the nuts, and they start to brown, remove from heat immediately and place in a small bowl so they don’t continue cooking.

In a large bowl, combine the flour, baking soda, sugars, salt, cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, and cooled nuts. Mix well and set aside.

In a two-cup liquid measuring cup, combine the milk, eggs, and oil. Add the liquid all at once to the dry and mix gently. Do not over mix.

Place in the prepared pan and level out, then bake for 55 to 65 minutes, testing at the early end. Let cool on a wire rack before cutting; it will be difficult to control yourself, but you won’t want to ruin the texture of the bread by slicing it while hot. Store in the refrigerator.

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