• Ginseng Season: It's Harvest Time, But Botanists Urge Restraint
  • Ginseng Season: It's Harvest Time, But Botanists Urge Restraint

    In Vermont, the legal season for collecting wild American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) runs from September 1 through October 31, making this a good time to follow up on a 2008 Local Banquet article by biologist Rick Enser, "A Gathering Storm." Wild ginseng populations had fallen to concerning levels when he wrote his piece in 2008, what has happened since? 

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Ron Krupp

Ron Krupp

Ron Krupp is the author of the Vermont organic gardening book The Woodchuck’s Guide to Gardening. He will be coming out with a new book this spring called Lifting the Yoke–Local Solutions to America’s Farm and Food Crisis. The book focuses on Vermont.

Last Morsel—Robert King

Ron Krupp | March 01, 2009 | Commentary

pitchforks

Robert King is renowned in southeast Vermont for his vast knowledge of gardening and the many workshops he leads to teach people how to grow their own food. His longtime friend Ron Krupp recently interviewed him about his life. This is a portion of that interview.

The Underground Garden

Ron Krupp | December 01, 2007 | Issues Archive

Robert

My good friend Robert King, who lives on Putney Mountain, built a root cellar in the 1970s on the hillside just south of his home. Easy access came from the gravel road, where he could drive his truck right up to the root cellar. The site was protected from the north wind and snow drifts. The door opened to the east, not the south where it would have received too much sun. Robert used the Scott Nearing simple stone construction method. First, pour concrete footings and then, using movable wooden frames, fill them with cement and rocks and let them dry. Then move the frames above the first-poured section and start again. It’s simple and practical.

Local Agricultural Community Exchange

| September 01, 2007 | Community & History

LACE

When the Farmers Diner left Barre for Quechee last fall, it left a “local food gap” downtown that is being filled by a new nonprofit initiative called LACE. The name stands for Local Agricultural Community Exchange. It’s a local-oriented grocery store, cafe, and educational center located in the former Homer Fitts Co. department store in downtown Barre. LACE’s founder, Ariel Zevon, has made it her mission to help the Barre community reconnect with local farmers and provide healthy food to the people of central Vermont. 

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Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape ties into larger questions of sustainability and the future of our food supply. 

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