• Updated Website Address: LocalBanquet.org
  • Looking Back on a Decade of Maple Innovation
  • Listening to Farmers’ Voices in the Ecosystem Services Discussion
  • Updated Website Address: LocalBanquet.org

    We've changed our website. Please update your bookmarks to LocalBanquet.org LocalBanquet.org is where you will now find the latest Local Banquet stories, a new Story of the Day update feature, features from the archives, and information on how to contribute to Local Banquet if you're interested in writing about Vermont agriculture. 

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  • Looking Back on a Decade of Maple Innovation

    Back in 2007, Local Baquet ran an article by Bonnie Hudspeth on maple innovation and production in Vermont. Since then, maple production in Vermont has tripled to 1.8 million gallons a year and innovation seems to have entered a new golden (or perhaps amber) age. We did a quick maple innovation news round up for 2018 / 2019 to help everyone keep up with the some of the trends. 

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  • Listening to Farmers’ Voices in the Ecosystem Services Discussion

    In 2015, the USDA funded a project for UVM researchers to engage in discussions with Vermont farmers about the idea of being paid for ecosystem services. Ecosystem services are things farmers do that improve the environment for everyone, a common example is grass-based farms capturing carbon in the soil as a way to combat climate change. Some services happen naturally through sustainable farming, others take more of an incentive to implement, and either way some policy makers believe that farmers shoudl be compensated for their contribution. 

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Publishers' Note Summer 2007

Garlic

Written on

June 01 , 2007

Thank you for picking up the premiere issue of Vermont’s Local Banquet. We hope that you find it enjoyable and that it provides you with some engaging, as well as practical, information!

You may be wondering who we are and why we’re publishing this magazine, so we’d like to take this opportunity to introduce ourselves.

During the past six years, we have spent a majority of our time working with local and state advocacy groups to help promote sustainable and organic farming practices, educate the public about the importance of sustainable communities, and pass legislation protecting farmers’ rights. As we’ve talked with farmers and food producers over the years, it has become obvious to us that supporting locally grown food right here at home leads to better health, stronger local economies and less of an impact on our environment.

We have come to believe that making an investment in locally grown products brings large returns to our communities.

Purchasing food grown locally also allows us to have direct relationships with our local farmers, so we can know how our food is grown and choose to buy organic or hormone-free foods, if that is our preference. We also support our family farmers when we buy from them, helping them maintain their livelihood and provide the quality products  we’ve come to appreciate. Keeping our food dollars in the local economy also preserves and strengthens that economy. According to the Vermont Department of Agriculture, if Vermonters shifted just 10% of their food purchases to locally grown products we would add more than $100 million to Vermont's economy. Once we, as consumers, understand how dependence on distant food sources threatens our security and the livelihood of our farmer neighbors, we can understand the value of spending our food dollars locally. 

Vermont’s Local Banquet, inspired by our belief that local food is a gateway to stronger communities, will strive to be a meeting place for all those who enjoy eating, growing, raising, cooking, or selling locally grown food. Within these pages, each season, we hope to deliver stories and ideas that support and energize our region. We hope to provide ‘food for thought.’ 

Meg Lucas and Barbi Schreiber

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What we do

Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape ties into larger questions of sustainability and the future of our food supply.