• Updated Website Address: LocalBanquet.org
  • Looking Back on a Decade of Maple Innovation
  • Listening to Farmers’ Voices in the Ecosystem Services Discussion
  • Updated Website Address: LocalBanquet.org

    We've changed our website. Please update your bookmarks to LocalBanquet.org LocalBanquet.org is where you will now find the latest Local Banquet stories, a new Story of the Day update feature, features from the archives, and information on how to contribute to Local Banquet if you're interested in writing about Vermont agriculture. 

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  • Looking Back on a Decade of Maple Innovation

    Back in 2007, Local Baquet ran an article by Bonnie Hudspeth on maple innovation and production in Vermont. Since then, maple production in Vermont has tripled to 1.8 million gallons a year and innovation seems to have entered a new golden (or perhaps amber) age. We did a quick maple innovation news round up for 2018 / 2019 to help everyone keep up with the some of the trends. 

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  • Listening to Farmers’ Voices in the Ecosystem Services Discussion

    In 2015, the USDA funded a project for UVM researchers to engage in discussions with Vermont farmers about the idea of being paid for ecosystem services. Ecosystem services are things farmers do that improve the environment for everyone, a common example is grass-based farms capturing carbon in the soil as a way to combat climate change. Some services happen naturally through sustainable farming, others take more of an incentive to implement, and either way some policy makers believe that farmers shoudl be compensated for their contribution. 

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Home for the Holidays—Vegan and Gluten-free Recipes

Raechel and Indira
Raechel and Indira

Written By

Raechel Barone

Written on

June 28 , 2013

Increasingly in my work as a baker and co-owner of On The Rise Bakery in Richmond, I am fielding questions such as, “My son-in-law is a vegan—do you have anything without dairy?” Or, “I was recently diagnosed with celiac disease—can you make a gluten-free dessert that my whole family will like?” One of our breakfast cooks even shared the following with us: “My grandmother seriously thought I could just eat around the pork in her baked beans, even though I’ve been a vegetarian since I was 10!”

My history of “cooking inclusively” for the holidays stretches back before my “On The Rise days,” to the family dinners my relatives prepared when I was young. After I became a vegetarian and my uncle became a vegan, my mother created amazing Thanksgiving meals where the only dish he and I couldn’t eat was the turkey. To this day, the array of side dishes she serves each year is extraordinary, and they are more than hearty enough to please the meat eaters.

Anyone who has tried his or her hand at preparing a holiday meal knows that with tradition comes expectation. The challenge is finding the right balance between accommodating different dietary needs and honoring the way things have been done in the past. Here are some options for creating “new old-favorites.” These are substantive dishes that are pleasing to the palate in ways we expect from holiday food, but that are made without animal products veganand are gluten-free. And because they achieve their deliciousness without the use of overprocessed or imported ingredients, we can support our local growers when we cook these dishes, as well as meet the needs of the people we love.

ncreasingly in my work as a baker and co-owner of On The Rise Bakery in Richmond, I am fielding questions such as, “My son-in-law is a vegan—do you have anything without dairy?” Or, “I was recently diagnosed with celiac disease—can you make a gluten-free dessert that my whole family will like?” One of our breakfast cooks even shared the following with us: “My grandmother seriously thought I could just eat around the pork in her baked beans, even though I’ve been a vegetarian since I was 10!”

My history of “cooking inclusively” for the holidays stretches back before my “On The Rise days,” to the family dinners my relatives prepared when I was young. After I became a vegetarian and my uncle became a vegan, my mother created amazing Thanksgiving meals where the only dish he and I couldn’t eat was the turkey. To this day, the array of side dishes she serves each year is extraordinary, and they are more than hearty enough to please the meat eaters.

Anyone who has tried his or her hand at preparing a holiday meal knows that with tradition comes expectation. The challenge is finding the right balance between accommodating different dietary needs and honoring the way things have been done in the past. Here are some options for creating “new old-favorites.” These are substantive dishes that are pleasing to the palate in ways we expect from holiday food, but that are made without animal products vegan and are gluten-free. And because they achieve their deliciousness without the use of overprocessed or imported ingredients, we can support our local growers when we cook these dishes, as well as meet the needs of the people we love.

About the Author

Raechel Barone

Raechel Barone

Raechel Barone is a baker and co-owner of On The Rise Bakery in Richmond. Raechel, her husband, and a dedicated crew serve upwood-fired pizzas, handmade bagels, and scores of fresh goodies daily.

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