• Brief Update from the Legislature
  • Writers Panel at NOFA-VT Conference
  • Brief Update from the Legislature

    This past Friday, March 15th, was crossover in the state house - this is the day that bills in policy committees need to get voted out of committee if they’re going to stay on deadline for passing this year. It’s a good indicator of priorities, although some bills do get special extensions and budget items have a later deadline. Given that this is a traditional taking stock moment for legislative work, we checked in with some groups that spend a lot of time in the state house to find out their thoughts on legislation to watch.

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Home for the Holidays—Vegan and Gluten-free Recipes

Raechel and Indira
Raechel and Indira

Written By

Raechel Barone

Written on

June 28 , 2013

Increasingly in my work as a baker and co-owner of On The Rise Bakery in Richmond, I am fielding questions such as, “My son-in-law is a vegan—do you have anything without dairy?” Or, “I was recently diagnosed with celiac disease—can you make a gluten-free dessert that my whole family will like?” One of our breakfast cooks even shared the following with us: “My grandmother seriously thought I could just eat around the pork in her baked beans, even though I’ve been a vegetarian since I was 10!”

My history of “cooking inclusively” for the holidays stretches back before my “On The Rise days,” to the family dinners my relatives prepared when I was young. After I became a vegetarian and my uncle became a vegan, my mother created amazing Thanksgiving meals where the only dish he and I couldn’t eat was the turkey. To this day, the array of side dishes she serves each year is extraordinary, and they are more than hearty enough to please the meat eaters.

Anyone who has tried his or her hand at preparing a holiday meal knows that with tradition comes expectation. The challenge is finding the right balance between accommodating different dietary needs and honoring the way things have been done in the past. Here are some options for creating “new old-favorites.” These are substantive dishes that are pleasing to the palate in ways we expect from holiday food, but that are made without animal products veganand are gluten-free. And because they achieve their deliciousness without the use of overprocessed or imported ingredients, we can support our local growers when we cook these dishes, as well as meet the needs of the people we love.

ncreasingly in my work as a baker and co-owner of On The Rise Bakery in Richmond, I am fielding questions such as, “My son-in-law is a vegan—do you have anything without dairy?” Or, “I was recently diagnosed with celiac disease—can you make a gluten-free dessert that my whole family will like?” One of our breakfast cooks even shared the following with us: “My grandmother seriously thought I could just eat around the pork in her baked beans, even though I’ve been a vegetarian since I was 10!”

My history of “cooking inclusively” for the holidays stretches back before my “On The Rise days,” to the family dinners my relatives prepared when I was young. After I became a vegetarian and my uncle became a vegan, my mother created amazing Thanksgiving meals where the only dish he and I couldn’t eat was the turkey. To this day, the array of side dishes she serves each year is extraordinary, and they are more than hearty enough to please the meat eaters.

Anyone who has tried his or her hand at preparing a holiday meal knows that with tradition comes expectation. The challenge is finding the right balance between accommodating different dietary needs and honoring the way things have been done in the past. Here are some options for creating “new old-favorites.” These are substantive dishes that are pleasing to the palate in ways we expect from holiday food, but that are made without animal products vegan and are gluten-free. And because they achieve their deliciousness without the use of overprocessed or imported ingredients, we can support our local growers when we cook these dishes, as well as meet the needs of the people we love.

About the Author

Raechel Barone

Raechel Barone

Raechel Barone is a baker and co-owner of On The Rise Bakery in Richmond. Raechel, her husband, and a dedicated crew serve upwood-fired pizzas, handmade bagels, and scores of fresh goodies daily.

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