• Heritage Ciders from Tannic Apples: New England’s OG Wine
  • Heritage Ciders from Tannic Apples: New England’s OG Wine

    Your favorite apples from the grocery store don’t have much in the way of tannin, and they make an alcoholic cider that New Englanders from the Founding Fathers time would have scorned - cider was once the wine of the Northeast, and today heritage ciders are bringing back that tradition. 

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Henry Homeyer

Henry Homeyer

Henry Homeyer is the author of 4 gardening books including The Vermont Gardener's Companion. He writes a weekly column for several Vermont newspapers and blogs at www.dailyUV.com. He is a regular commentator on Vermont Public Radio.

Vermont's Got a New Organics Business

Henry Homeyer | July 14, 2018 | Garden Pathways

Vermont's

For more than thirty years, Paul Sachs has been making fertilizers for organic growers. He learned how to create fertilizers using natural ingredients to include all the minerals needed by plants, not just the “Big Three” – nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium. His fertilizers naturally include magnesium, calcium, iron, copper, zinc, and boron from sources such as seaweed, cottonseed meal, ground peanut hulls, and minerals like rock phosphate and green sand. . .

Putting the Garden to Bed

Henry Homeyer | August 19, 2013 | Garden Pathways

Various

There are many distractions at this time of year, whether school or watching football or catching up on work and e-mail after an August vacation. But one thing’s for sure: autumn—and winter—are coming, and we need to put our gardens to bed. A little extra work now will help us garden even better next year.

Storing Your Harvest

Winter and Beyond

Henry Homeyer | August 30, 2012 | Fall '12 | Issue twenty-two

Storing

Until the mid 1950s, gardeners often slaved away at canning— or putting into jars—as much food from the garden as possible. Tomatoes, beans, carrots, peas…you name it, our grannies canned it. This was a time when fresh produce at the grocery store was expensive in winter and often limp and bedraggled.

The 9' x 12' Vegetable Garden

Some basics on how to start a plot of your own

Henry Homeyer | March 01, 2009 | Garden Pathways

Henry

If you’re able to devote 15 minutes a day to gardening and are willing to give up a piece of your lawn roughly the size of the parking space for your car, you can grow a significant amount of good food—food that is organic, food that is tasty, food that is healthy. During World War II, Americans started “victory gardens,” growing up to 40 percent of their fresh produce. In these tough economic times, it again makes sense for us to grow some of our own food.

What we do

Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape ties into larger questions of sustainability and the future of our food supply. 

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