• Updated Website Address: LocalBanquet.org
  • Looking Back on a Decade of Maple Innovation
  • Listening to Farmers’ Voices in the Ecosystem Services Discussion
  • Updated Website Address: LocalBanquet.org

    We've changed our website. Please update your bookmarks to LocalBanquet.org LocalBanquet.org is where you will now find the latest Local Banquet stories, a new Story of the Day update feature, features from the archives, and information on how to contribute to Local Banquet if you're interested in writing about Vermont agriculture. 

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  • Looking Back on a Decade of Maple Innovation

    Back in 2007, Local Baquet ran an article by Bonnie Hudspeth on maple innovation and production in Vermont. Since then, maple production in Vermont has tripled to 1.8 million gallons a year and innovation seems to have entered a new golden (or perhaps amber) age. We did a quick maple innovation news round up for 2018 / 2019 to help everyone keep up with the some of the trends. 

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  • Listening to Farmers’ Voices in the Ecosystem Services Discussion

    In 2015, the USDA funded a project for UVM researchers to engage in discussions with Vermont farmers about the idea of being paid for ecosystem services. Ecosystem services are things farmers do that improve the environment for everyone, a common example is grass-based farms capturing carbon in the soil as a way to combat climate change. Some services happen naturally through sustainable farming, others take more of an incentive to implement, and either way some policy makers believe that farmers shoudl be compensated for their contribution. 

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Colonial Flip

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Colonial tankard

Flip was a concoction of strong ale with a bit of sweetener and sometimes a dose of dried pumpkin. The drink was mixed in a large mug, into which was thrust a red-hot loggerhead or poker, causing it to bubble and froth, or “flip,” then finished with a healthy dose of New England rum.

Ingredients

  • 20 ounces barley wine or other strong, malty beer
  • 1 Tb brown sugar or molasses
  • 2 ounces dark rum
  • A poker or other iron rod heated in the coals of a wood fire
  • Optional: a sprinkle of dried pumpkin or grated nutmeg

Directions

In large earthenware mugs, combine the brown sugar or molasses with the beer. The mugs should only be filled two-thirds of the way or they will overflow.

Carefully remove the poker from the fire and immerse it in the mug. Reheat and repeat. Finish with rum and the optional spices.

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Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape ties into larger questions of sustainability and the future of our food supply.