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Summer '14 | Issue twenty-nine

A Vermont Pasture

(Published 1922)

Daniel L. Cady | May 26, 2014 | Summer '14 | Issue twenty-nine

the pasture ledges at Twig Farm, West Cornwall, Vermont; by Michael Claypool

You have to work your tillage land
And mow and hoe and plow it,
But as for pasture, all you do
Is jest to sheep or cow it;
And you can walk jest where you please,
Instead of ‘round the edges,
And Sunday you can go and set
Upon the pasture ledges.

Farmers' Kitchen—Sprouting Up

Rebbeca Beidler | May 23, 2014 | Farmers' Kitchen

Rebbeca Beidler and Jeffery Ellis

When visitors come through the door of our grow room, they often inhale deeply and exclaim how nice it is to see and smell green growing things bursting from trays, especially in the heart of winter. At Peace of Earth Farm in Albany, we grow a variety of vegetables and fruits, but we also grow harder-to-find shoots and sprouts.

Why Mid-Scale Farming Is Important in Vermont

Ela Chapin and Liz Gleason | May 23, 2014 | Food Systems & Policy

Bags of veggies from Pete's Greens

Vermont’s vibrant farm economy is made up of all sizes, scales, and types of farms—something that’s beneficial, because a high diversity of scale and business model is critical to improving the sustainability and resiliency of our food system. Yet within Vermont (and outside Vermont) there is a particular fondness for the smallest scale farms.

Cafeteria Cooking: A New Era in Vermont Schools

Bonnie North | May 23, 2014 | Issues Archive

Karyl Kent, David Horner, and Alison Forrest

We all know that “You can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make him drink.” Similarly, as any parent knows, you can put good, healthy food on kids’ lunch plates but that’s no guarantee they’ll actually eat it. But who can blame them? Consider what they’re used to.

Farm-ecology

How one Vermont farm is addressing climate change and pollinator loss.

Nancy Hayden | May 23, 2014 | On the Farm

Apple blossoms at The Farm Between

My husband, John, reminds me every so often that in a world of seven billion people it is a privilege to own land. This is a good thing to contemplate as I stack brush and run it through the wood chipper. After a long winter, I’m already feeling the ache in my back and shoulders from only a few hours of work.

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What we do

Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape ties into larger questions of sustainability and the future of our food supply.