0
Shares

Fall '15 | Issue thirty-four

Frankly Speaking

How to make a local hot dog at home…or maybe not

Claire Fitts Georges | August 24, 2015 | Fall '15 | Issue thirty-four

hotdog links

Hot dogs are the epitome of mass-produced, questionably sourced food product. They are the emulsified bits and scraps of mechanically separated cartilage, tendons, and other meat undesirables that don’t belong anywhere else.

An Early Abenaki Harvest: The Green Corn Celebration

Fred Wiseman | August 24, 2015 | Fall '15 | Issue thirty-four

Corn dancers

Traditionally, summer was a time of constant and existential worry for Abenaki farmers. Vermont’s notoriously fickle weather inundates the fields in June and parches them in July.

Set the Table with Garlic

Laura Sorkin | August 24, 2015 | Fall '15 | Issue thirty-four

Basket of Garlic

If you search the word garlic online, you may end up believing it is the panacea for all that ails us. Garlic was given to soldiers and athletes in ancient Greece to promote vigor.

Aronia and Elderberry: Thy Medicine

Nancy Hayden | August 24, 2015 | Fall '15 | Issue thirty-four

Elderberry Shurbs

Aronia and elderberry are two fruits—native to Vermont and other places in the eastern United States—that are getting noticed by health-conscious consumers. The word on the street these days is “nutraceutical”—in this case, referring to berries that aren’t just nutritious but also have medicinal properties.

Editor's Note Fall 2015

Caroline Abels | August 19, 2015 | Fall '15 | Issue thirty-four

Dairy farmer picking up potatoes on his farm near Fairfield, Vermont, September 1941.

I’m writing this in early August, on the heels of Vermont Open Farm Week—seven days during which 75 farms, orchards, vineyards, distilleries, and nurseries opened their doors to the public for a concentrated week of public outreach.

<<  1 [2

What we do

Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape ties into larger questions of sustainability and the future of our food supply.