• Heritage Ciders from Tannic Apples: New England’s OG Wine
  • Heritage Ciders from Tannic Apples: New England’s OG Wine

    Your favorite apples from the grocery store don’t have much in the way of tannin, and they make an alcoholic cider that New Englanders from the Founding Fathers time would have scorned - cider was once the wine of the Northeast, and today heritage ciders are bringing back that tradition. 

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Spring '12 | Issue twenty

Publishers' Note Spring 2012

| June 01, 2012 | From the Editor

Davis Swing Churn, Vermont Farm Machine Company.

It’s hard for us to believe that this is our 20th issue! When we started publishing Vermont’s Local Banquet in 2007, “locavore” (without the “l”which is a Northeast addition) was the New Oxford American Dictionary’s word of the year. Folks were holding “localvore challenges” to learn how to eat locally, and there was lots of talk about food being essential to surviving in a “post-oil” world. Today, eating locally is commonplace for many people, but these were among the first steps Vermonters took toward recognizing the fundamental shifts taking place on our finite planet.

Be Square

How to garden easily and productively with square-foot gardening

Peter Burke | June 01, 2012 | Spring '12 | Issue twenty

Raised bed gardens

Three years ago I converted my front lawn into a garden plot. But it wasn’t your typical garden with rows of vegetables planted side by side. Instead, it was a garden of 12 raised beds that were divided into a bunch of square-foot plots, each one easy to plant and manage. I know it sounds counterintuitive—gardening is supposed to be hard work—but I am a fan of the simple method of square-foot gardening, which doesn’t refer to the size of your garden or the size of the beds, but to the method of preparing, planting, and maintaining a garden made up of square-foot grids.

Out of the Ashes

A Brief Local History of Potash and Pearlash

Pat McGovern | June 01, 2012 | Spring '12 | Issue twenty

Illustration by Herbert M. Stoops.

Salt, spices, and baking soda: these culinary staples posed a major challenge to Upper Valley localvores attempting our first 100-Mile Diet Challenge in August 2005. Such products couldn’t be found locally. The closest salt works were in Maine, just beyond our 100-mile radius. We had access to local herbs but few spices. And we wondered: just what is baking soda?

Set the Table with Fennel

Claire Fitts Georges | June 01, 2012 | Spring '12 | Issue twenty

fennel illustration

One of my favorite things about fennel is how there are so many different edible parts of the plant and how tasty they all seem to be. The bulb is what most folks think of when they think of cooking with fennel, but the seeds (which, interestingly, aren’t actually seeds, but dried up little fruits) are used around the world. Europeans, who first cultivated the fennel plant, include the seeds in Italian sausage. Middle Easterners use it in dukkah (a spice blend seasoning). Indians will often use it in chai. And Chinese five-spice powder is used across the nation (theirs and ours).

Vermont Heirlooms

Plants with (more than one) story to tell

Tatiana Schreiber | June 01, 2012 | Community & History

Chester Beans

My plan was to write an interesting story about a few vegetables that have a Vermont heritage—that is, they were grown in Vermont over many years or were thought to have first been developed commercially by Vermont farmers or breeders. I was thinking of Gilfeather® turnips, Green Mountain potatoes, Chester beans, and Roy’s Calais Flint corn, as examples.

Little did I realize, however, how murky these waters would be.

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Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape ties into larger questions of sustainability and the future of our food supply. 

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