• Heritage Ciders from Tannic Apples: New England’s OG Wine
  • Heritage Ciders from Tannic Apples: New England’s OG Wine

    Your favorite apples from the grocery store don’t have much in the way of tannin, and they make an alcoholic cider that New Englanders from the Founding Fathers time would have scorned - cider was once the wine of the Northeast, and today heritage ciders are bringing back that tradition. 

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Spring '10 | Issue twelve

Last Morsel—A Perfect Day

| March 01, 2010 | Commentary

Corn stalks

Each year, Monkton Central School in the Champlain Valley holds its annual Farming in Monkton Writing Contest. Students in grades 3 to 6 are invited to write a sketch about farming, and entries are evaluated by a local judge. Following is the 2009 winning entry, written by 11-year-old Ashley Turner. It’s a fictional account, based on her real-life experiences on various Monkton farms.

Farmers' Kitchen—Seeing Purple

| March 01, 2010 | Farmers' Kitchen

Bill Half and Ellen Gershun

Many people mark the arrival of spring with the sighting of the first robin. On our farm, the true harbinger of spring is the sight and taste of the first asparagus that noses its way out of the ground. Growing outdoors is a challenge for all farmers in the Northeast Kingdom—where, as the saying goes, one is never sure if a July frost indicates the last frost of spring or the first frost of fall. Asparagus means that spring not only has arrived but is here to stay, a cause for celebration.

A Nose to Tail Heart to Heart

Brett Champlain | March 01, 2010 | Issues Archive

Brett Champlain

If I seem a little distracted, it’s most likely because I have to finish an order of cow’s tongue, warm up a duck’s heart, or explain the difference between fat-back and bacon to a curious but suspicious patron. It’s not that I don’t want to sit and talk—I’d love to have a beer with you, talk about where our ingredients come from, let you know that the rabbits really do like to be fed carrots, note the difference between Muscovy and Peking duck. It’s just that right now, there’s a couple in front of the Belgian taps who are waiting on their cheese plate. Be right back…

A Farmhouse Feeds Its Neighbors

Food Works’ Two Rivers Center Opens a New Root Cellar and Builds from There

Elizabeth Ferry | March 01, 2010 | Community & History

Two Rivers Building

When Joseph Kiefer and Martin Kemple founded Food Works in 1987, phrases such as “food security” and “local food system” had yet to come into common parlance. It was ambitious—maybe even radical at the time—to think of using gardens and locally grown food to address the root causes of childhood hunger.

Celebrate with “Vermatzah”

| March 01, 2010 | Issues Archive

Matzah making at Naga Bakehouse

Matzah has been used for centuries to celebrate Passover and the start of spring. Now it can be used to celebrate local wheat and heritage grains, too.

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