• Updated Website Address: LocalBanquet.org
  • Looking Back on a Decade of Maple Innovation
  • Listening to Farmers’ Voices in the Ecosystem Services Discussion
  • Updated Website Address: LocalBanquet.org

    We've changed our website. Please update your bookmarks to LocalBanquet.org LocalBanquet.org is where you will now find the latest Local Banquet stories, a new Story of the Day update feature, features from the archives, and information on how to contribute to Local Banquet if you're interested in writing about Vermont agriculture. 

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  • Looking Back on a Decade of Maple Innovation

    Back in 2007, Local Baquet ran an article by Bonnie Hudspeth on maple innovation and production in Vermont. Since then, maple production in Vermont has tripled to 1.8 million gallons a year and innovation seems to have entered a new golden (or perhaps amber) age. We did a quick maple innovation news round up for 2018 / 2019 to help everyone keep up with the some of the trends. 

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  • Listening to Farmers’ Voices in the Ecosystem Services Discussion

    In 2015, the USDA funded a project for UVM researchers to engage in discussions with Vermont farmers about the idea of being paid for ecosystem services. Ecosystem services are things farmers do that improve the environment for everyone, a common example is grass-based farms capturing carbon in the soil as a way to combat climate change. Some services happen naturally through sustainable farming, others take more of an incentive to implement, and either way some policy makers believe that farmers shoudl be compensated for their contribution. 

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Recipes

Vermont's Local Banquet brings you recipes in one easily indexed, online format so you can return to the dishes, desserts, and appetizers over and over again.

  • Time: 10 minutes prep
  • Complexity: easy

Tahini Garlic Salad Dressing

Salad Dressing

This salad dressing gets a hint of creaminess from the addition of tahini. Garlic and lemon combine to give it a Middle Eastern flavor. It's wonderful served with kale or mixed greens.

  • Time: 30 minutes prep; 20 minutes on stove
  • Complexity: easy

Cold Quell Soup

Cold Quell Soup

Serve this bold yet simple soup at the first suggestion of a cold or flu as a bit of preventative medicine: The oil from the mustard greens warms the nasal passages, helps disperse congestion, and increases energy flow throughout the body; the greens help move stuck energy; and the yam and ginger support qi and blood circulation. The yam’s sweet flavor also acts as a counterpoint to the piquant greens and ginger.

  • Time: 24–48 hours on stove
  • Complexity: easy

Bone Stock

Bone Broth

We make a week’s supply of stock and freeze any that we’re not going to use within five days. We use it liberally in our soups, stews, and any savory dish that calls for liquid. Or, for a quick energy boost, we season it to taste and drink it as an on-the-spot restorative. I often toss in a square of the mineral-rich kombu seaweed, which adds even more nutrients and enhances the stock’s savory (umami) flavor.

  • Time: 30 minutes prep; 20 minutes in oven; 6 minutes on stove
  • Complexity: medium

Alpaca “Steak Frites”

Alpaca “Steak Frites”

 From the Cas-Cad-Nac Farm Cookbook. Our family’s favorite recipe to come out of this project is Chef Matecat’s version of steak frites, which uses our alpaca striploin medallions. Lately, we’ve served them with the addition of a garlicky chimichurri sauce on the side.

  • Time: 30 minutes prep; 20 minutes on stove
  • Complexity: easy

Alu-Mattar-Gobi

Alu-Mattar-Gobi

Try cooking this simple yet healthful meal. It is a favorite for kids and adults alike!Try cooking this simple yet healthful meal. It is a favorite for kids and adults alike!

  • Time: 20 minutes prep; 90 minutes in oven
  • Complexity: medium

Whole Roasted Chicken with Roasted Garlic and White Wine Jus

Garlic

The most important role of garlic, of course, is as an ingredient. Where to use garlic is like asking where one should use butter: everywhere.

  • Time: 10 minutes prep; 30 minutes over fire
  • Complexity: easy

Campfire Ratatouille with Farmers’ Market Veggies

Campfire corn on the cob

In every recipe, there are ingredients included that prevent the food from sticking to the foil. This can be butter, as in the recipe for roasted potatoes, or the juices from vegetables, as in the garlic and tomato chicken or campfire ratatouille. Substitutions can be made in these recipes, but be sure to include something (butter, oil, or juicy vegetables) to prevent your food from sticking to the foil packets.

  • Time: 10 minutes prep; 30 minutes over fire
  • Complexity: easy

Campfire Corn on the Cob

Campfire corn on the cob

In every recipe, there are ingredients included that prevent the food from sticking to the foil. This can be butter, as in the recipe for roasted potatoes, or the juices from vegetables, as in the garlic and tomato chicken or campfire ratatouille. Substitutions can be made in these recipes, but be sure to include something (butter, oil, or juicy vegetables) to prevent your food from sticking to the foil packets.

  • Time: 10 minutes prep; 30 minutes over fire
  • Complexity: easy

Roasted Campfire Potatoes

Potatoes roasting over campfire

In every recipe, there are ingredients included that prevent the food from sticking to the foil. This can be butter, as in the recipe for roasted potatoes, or the juices from vegetables, as in the garlic and tomato chicken or campfire ratatouille. Substitutions can be made in these recipes, but be sure to include something (butter, oil, or juicy vegetables) to prevent your food from sticking to the foil packets.

  • Time: 20 minutes prep; 30 minutes over fire
  • Complexity: easy

Campfire Garlic and Tomato Chicken

Campfire Garlic and Tomato Chicken

In every recipe, there are ingredients included that prevent the food from sticking to the foil. This can be butter, as in the recipe for roasted potatoes, or the juices from vegetables, as in the garlic and tomato chicken or campfire ratatouille. Substitutions can be made in these recipes, but be sure to include something (butter, oil, or juicy vegetables) to prevent your food from sticking to the foil packets.

  • Time: 30 minutes prep; 20 minutes on stove
  • Complexity: easy

Vegetable Stew with Okra

Vegetable Stew with Okra

One of our “go-to” okra recipes to prepare in September (when we have a little more time) is a vegetable “gumbo.” We sauté onions and garlic, then add okra, zucchini, tomatoes, hot pepper, and sometimes eggplant. We season this with fresh basil, parsley, and oregano. Make a big batch and, after eating your fill, freeze the rest up for some mid-winter veggie therapy!

  • Time: 30 minutes prep
  • Complexity: easy

Simple Crock-Pot Rabbit

Rabbit Stew

“My favorite way of cooking rabbit is to simmer it slowly with onions, celery, and seasonings,” Robin Schunk of New Discovery Farm says. “Then I pick the meat off the bone and use it for chili and quesadillas.”

After searching out a rabbit recipe for myself, I put together this using Robin’s favorite seasonings.

 
  • Time: 30 minutes prep
  • Complexity: easy

Prosciutto-Wrapped Pickled Asparagus

Prosciutto-Wrapped Pickled Asparagus

This is the perfect make-ahead party food: Have your pickled asparagus spears on hand and it takes just minutes to wrap them, rewarding you with an elegant presentation and a salty, tangy take on the classic app.

© Cultured Foods for Your Kitchen: 100 Recipes Featuring the Bold Flavors of Fermentation by Leda Scheintaub, Rizzoli New York, 2014

 
  • Time: 5–6 hours
  • Complexity: easy

Roasted Pork Shoulder

roast pork shoulder

I love cooking pork, but I’m not going to give you much of a recipe here. As a finished product, what you’ll get from this is a pile of pork that is salty and delicious. You can turn it into pulled pork, Bo Ssäm, some Italian gravy, or hundreds of other dishes. That part will be up to you.

In New England, these are often cut and called a Boston butt. Ours are bone-in with a nice fat cap on them, but this recipe can be made with a boneless piece or a picnic ham (fresh, not smoked). As long as you have a big piece of meat from the shoulder, it’ll be fine.

  • Time: 5 minutes prep
  • Complexity: easy

Spring Cider Vinaigrette

cider vinaigrette

Tweak to suit your taste and enjoy. Makes a nice marinade, too.

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What we do

Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape ties into larger questions of sustainability and the future of our food supply.