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On the Farm

How to Love a Lease—Young farmers

Two farms, two relationships: advice from farmers in the fields

Andrew Stowe | July 03, 2013 | On the Farm

Nicole Duch and Ben Uris of Seedfolks Farm

At the end of a mostly impassable class 4 road in Calais lies the brick farmhouse of Fair Food Farm. In some ways it seems remote, but as Emily Curtis-Murphy sees it, “It’s a great place to farm.” Before she delves into her experience of farming on leased land, Emily takes me on a brief tour. She and her family rent their house from one landlord and, two miles away, rent land owned by a different landlord for the rest of Fair Food’s operation.

How to Love a Lease—Vermont landowners

Organizations help strengthen the landowner-farmer relationship

Rachel Carter | July 03, 2013 | On the Farm

Landowner Mary Ashcroft and  farmer Carol Tashie in Rutland.

Sustainability, simply stated, is the capacity to endure. But the high cost of land in Vermont, combined with the financial challenges of owning land, are threatening the sustainability of local agriculture. According to Vermont’s Farm to Plate report, “Affordable access to farmland was described [by stakeholders] as a serious barrier for new farmers or those seeking to grow and expand.”

Down Home Distilling

Local spirit makers add Vermont ingredients to their concoctionsby

Helen Labun | April 04, 2013 | On the Farm

Barr Hill Gin

Here’s the first thing you should know about making specialty liquors: cupcake vodka is not made by fermenting cupcakes. Likewise for the cotton candy, cookie dough, whipped cream, and caramel vodkas all lining store shelves today. These trendy varieties are made by adding flavoring after the vodka is distilled; it’s why we can have cocktails that resemble a dessert buffet. For many consumers today, this is the most familiar way to make a vodka stand out from the rest. But it isn’t the only way.

Hothouse Hydro

Vermont Hydroponics Seeks to Grow Tasty Local Tomatoes in Less Space

Jeffrey Gangemi | October 25, 2012 | Fall '12 | Issue twenty-two

Vermont Hydroponics

Islands have always had a local food problem. Granted, they’re often located in warm environments, have rich soil, and enjoy the kind of tourists who might want to sample an obscure local vegetable. But for many sun worshippers, lush green hills and mangroves make for a stark contrast to the dull and unappetizing non-local food on their plates.

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What we do

Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape ties into larger questions of sustainability and the future of our food supply. 

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