• Ceres, Goddess of Agriculture, Returns to State House
  • Heritage Ciders from Tannic Apples: New England’s OG Wine
  • Local Wineries & Cider Makers Tackle Food Waste with Collaboration
  • Ceres, Goddess of Agriculture, Returns to State House

    Agriculture has regained its place of pride in the Vermont state house as the new Ceres sculpture was lifted into place on November 30th. This version, made by local artists Chris Miller and Jerry Williams, is expected to reside on the golden dome for 150 years. 

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  • Heritage Ciders from Tannic Apples: New England’s OG Wine

    Your favorite apples from the grocery store don’t have much in the way of tannin, and they make an alcoholic cider that New Englanders from the Founding Fathers time would have scorned - cider was once the wine of the Northeast, and today heritage ciders are bringing back that tradition. 

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  • Local Wineries & Cider Makers Tackle Food Waste with Collaboration

    The crispness of fall has given way to chillier nights and snow dusted mornings throughout much of Vermont. It’s the season to tuck in with a glass of local wine or cider in hand. As you sip slowly, here's some food (or drink) for thought: what happens to the waste produced in the creation of your beverage? Where does that spent grape must and pomace go, aside from the compost bin?

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From the Editor

Editor's Note Fall 2013

Caroline Abels | August 19, 2013 | Fall '13 | Issue twenty-six

Apple press, Weathersfield; photo by Meg Lucas.

It’s a fulsome time to be an eater of local meat in Vermont—or simply a booster of its production. Compared with three years ago, when our last special issue on meat came out, you can now access more products from more farmers growing a wider variety of animals in more varying ways.

Publishers' Note Summer 2013

| July 03, 2013 | Summer '13 | Issue twenty-five

Boys with fish, 1949; photo courtesy of the Vermont State Archives and Records Administration.

According to a 2009 report prepared by the Lake Champlain Fish and Wildlife Management Cooperative, the earliest published account of fish in Lake Champlain was by Zadock Thompson in his Natural History of Vermont (1853). In his report, Thompson described 48 different species of fish, and historically, the commercial fisheries on the lake targeted whitefish, walleye, yellow perch, lake sturgeon, eel, and lake trout.

Editor’s Note Winter 2012

Caroline Abels | April 30, 2013 | From the Editor

Hay rake, U.S. National Archives and Records Administration.

We bushwhacked our way through a tangled patch of riverbank plants. The thick stems were still bent from the rushing flood waters, parallel with the ground as if bowing respectfully to the river. That river, the Dog River, was babbling as sweetly as any other Vermont tributary that early September day, but those of us on the volunteer clean-up crew at Dog River Farm in Berlin had a lot more respect for it—and for the power of water—than we’d had just a week before.

Publishers' Note Spring 2013

| March 01, 2013 | Issues Archive

Whiskey Barrel

Maybe you’ve noticed that the “spirits” of Vermont are on the move and showing up at liquor outlets, farmers’ markets, restaurants—even your friends’ homes—throughout the state. Are they friendly spirits, you ask? You bet! As with local food, Vermont is quickly becoming a state with a flourishing locally distilled spirits industry.

Editor's Note Winter 2013

Caroline Abels | January 16, 2013 | Issues Archive

Beets

It can be comforting to walk into a Vermont farmers’ market—winter or summer. Whether we’re frequent patrons or visiting from out of state, dropping by a market on a Saturday morning or Thursday afternoon can feel cozy and reassuring: all those farmers practicing healthy agriculture and guaranteeing our collective food security.

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Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape ties into larger questions of sustainability and the future of our food supply. 

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