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Commentary

Last Morsel—A Boost for On-Farm Slaughter

Caroline Abels | August 20, 2013 | Commentary

A carcus being cut up

Traditionally, farm animals in Vermont were slaughtered and butchered outside, in the open air. Today, all animals that are sold as meat must be slaughtered and processed in inspected facilities. But some Vermonters who raise animals for their own personal consumption prefer on-farm slaughter to taking their critters to an unfamiliar slaughterhouse.

Cannibalizing our Compatriots

Sean Buchanan | August 20, 2013 | Commentary

Packing room with crates

Vermont has big farms and little farms, organic and conventional growers, pasture-based and feedlot operations, old farmers and young farmers, entrepreneurs and large agribusinesses. In these Green Mountains and across this country we have a complex food production system, with each agricultural business doing what it can to stay viable and profitable.

Spare the Turkeys

LOCALVORE Vegetarian THANKSGIVING MENU

| June 11, 2013 | Commentary

Thankful turkeys

We asked our readers for Thanksgiving menu suggestions. Pat McGovern from the Upper Valley Localvores responded with this turkeyless feast. Here's a way to celebrate the harvest and give thanks and make a few turkeys happy at the same time.

Seventy-Two Is Not Thirty-Five

David Budbill | April 05, 2013 | Last Morsel

Maple tree in spring

I spent seven hours yesterday at my daughter’s house
helping her expand their garden by at least ten times.
We dug up sod by the shovelful, shook off the dirt as
best we could; sod into the wheelbarrow and off to the
pile at the edge of the yard. Then all that over and over
again. Five hours total work-time, with time out for lunch
and supper. By the time I got home I knew all too well
that seventy-two is not thirty-five; I could barely move.

Inviting the Pollinators

Tatiana Schreiber | January 01, 2013 | Commentary

Illustration by Constance M. Foot from Insect Wonderland, 1910. Courtesy of OldBookArt.com

Several years ago I was privileged to spend weeks and months at a time working in southern Mexico with organic coffee and cacao farmers. My first visit to a coffee farm is etched in my memory primarily through sound—the sound of bees.

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Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape ties into larger questions of sustainability and the future of our food supply. 

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