• Ceres, Goddess of Agriculture, Returns to State House
  • Heritage Ciders from Tannic Apples: New England’s OG Wine
  • Local Wineries & Cider Makers Tackle Food Waste with Collaboration
  • Ceres, Goddess of Agriculture, Returns to State House

    Agriculture has regained its place of pride in the Vermont state house as the new Ceres sculpture was lifted into place on November 30th. This version, made by local artists Chris Miller and Jerry Williams, is expected to reside on the golden dome for 150 years. 

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  • Heritage Ciders from Tannic Apples: New England’s OG Wine

    Your favorite apples from the grocery store don’t have much in the way of tannin, and they make an alcoholic cider that New Englanders from the Founding Fathers time would have scorned - cider was once the wine of the Northeast, and today heritage ciders are bringing back that tradition. 

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  • Local Wineries & Cider Makers Tackle Food Waste with Collaboration

    The crispness of fall has given way to chillier nights and snow dusted mornings throughout much of Vermont. It’s the season to tuck in with a glass of local wine or cider in hand. As you sip slowly, here's some food (or drink) for thought: what happens to the waste produced in the creation of your beverage? Where does that spent grape must and pomace go, aside from the compost bin?

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Community & History

Mark Kurlansky's "The Food of a Younger Land"

The Eating Habits of Americans (from the 1930s WPA chronicles)

| December 01, 2012 | Community & History

Photos from the Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division.

In the 1930s, writers for the Works Progress Administration (WPA) chronicled the eating habits of Americans. Here are some Vermont excerpts, as collected in Mark Kurlansky’s The Food of a Younger Land:

Neighbors Feeding Neighbors in St. Johnsbury

Robyn Greenstone | October 25, 2012 | Fall '12 | Issue twenty-two

St. Johnsbury Community Farm

Standing in a local supermarket last August, scanning the shelves for a lemon to complete the ingredient list for my mother’s celebrated cucumber salad, I felt like a complete foreigner. I realized, as I surveyed the rows of coolly aligned produce, that it had been a full five months since I stepped foot inside a grocery store.

This is because in the warmer months, the fruits of my own garden are frequently supplemented with produce and condiments from a variety of farm stands in the St. Johnsbury area and three local farmers’ markets.

Airport Flies Toward Local

Burlington International will soon have a local foods restaurant—actually, three of them

Benjy Adler | October 25, 2012 | Fall '12 | Issue twenty-two

Skinny Pancake

In January 2013, The Skinny Pancake will open what is likely to be the first-ever local foods restaurant in an American airport. In fact, we’re opening three of them at the Burlington International Airport (BTV): a Skinny Pancake in each of the two post-security terminals and a Chubby Muffin kiosk across from the check-in counters on the first floor.

For those of you who don’t know us, The Skinny Pancake and Chubby Muffin are sister-concept restaurants in Burlington and Montpelier with a mission to “change the world by building a safer, healthier, more delicious foodshed while creating everyday enjoyment that is fun and affordable.

Vermont Heirlooms

Plants with (more than one) story to tell

Tatiana Schreiber | June 01, 2012 | Community & History

Chester Beans

My plan was to write an interesting story about a few vegetables that have a Vermont heritage—that is, they were grown in Vermont over many years or were thought to have first been developed commercially by Vermont farmers or breeders. I was thinking of Gilfeather® turnips, Green Mountain potatoes, Chester beans, and Roy’s Calais Flint corn, as examples.

Little did I realize, however, how murky these waters would be.

Three Farms, One Town, One Storm

Devon Karn | December 01, 2011 | On the Farm

Hurricane Flats Farm August 28, 2011

The Perley Farm stretches between Route 107 and the White River in South Royalton, on a piece of land exactly level with the river. A highway bridge for I-89 runs right above the pasture. It’s a 40-year-old conventional dairy with a mixed herd of approximately two dozen cows, owned by Harlan “Duke” Perley and run by Larry and Penny Severance. A week before Tropical Storm Irene, Duke was in New Jersey, where he lives part time with his family, undergoing surgery to receive a pacemaker. When parts of the East Coast began to evacuate, he loaded up his two nieces, their two grandsons, and a daughter-in-law and headed up to the farm, where they thought they’d be safer.

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Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape ties into larger questions of sustainability and the future of our food supply. 

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