• Updated Website Address: LocalBanquet.org
  • Looking Back on a Decade of Maple Innovation
  • Listening to Farmers’ Voices in the Ecosystem Services Discussion
  • Updated Website Address: LocalBanquet.org

    We've changed our website. Please update your bookmarks to LocalBanquet.org LocalBanquet.org is where you will now find the latest Local Banquet stories, a new Story of the Day update feature, features from the archives, and information on how to contribute to Local Banquet if you're interested in writing about Vermont agriculture. 

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  • Looking Back on a Decade of Maple Innovation

    Back in 2007, Local Baquet ran an article by Bonnie Hudspeth on maple innovation and production in Vermont. Since then, maple production in Vermont has tripled to 1.8 million gallons a year and innovation seems to have entered a new golden (or perhaps amber) age. We did a quick maple innovation news round up for 2018 / 2019 to help everyone keep up with the some of the trends. 

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  • Listening to Farmers’ Voices in the Ecosystem Services Discussion

    In 2015, the USDA funded a project for UVM researchers to engage in discussions with Vermont farmers about the idea of being paid for ecosystem services. Ecosystem services are things farmers do that improve the environment for everyone, a common example is grass-based farms capturing carbon in the soil as a way to combat climate change. Some services happen naturally through sustainable farming, others take more of an incentive to implement, and either way some policy makers believe that farmers shoudl be compensated for their contribution. 

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Community & History

Ceres, Goddess of Agriculture, Returns to State House

Local Banquet | November 30, 2018 | Fall '18

Ceres, Goddess of Agriculture, Returns to State House

Agriculture has regained its place of pride in the Vermont state house as the new Ceres sculpture was lifted into place on November 30th. This version, made by local artists Chris Miller and Jerry Williams, is expected to reside on the golden dome for 150 years. 

Heritage Ciders from Tannic Apples: New England’s OG Wine

Eleanor Léger | September 29, 2018 | Fall '18

Heritage Ciders from Tannic Apples: New England’s OG Wine

Your favorite apples from the grocery store don’t have much in the way of tannin, and they make an alcoholic cider that New Englanders from the Founding Fathers time would have scorned - cider was once the wine of the Northeast, and today heritage ciders are bringing back that tradition. 

Bringing Back the Local Grain Economy

One Mill at a Time

Pamela Hunt | August 16, 2017 | On the Farm

Each millstone is hand shaped.

Blair Marvin and Andrew Heyn of Elmore Mountain Bread have been baking together for 14 years. They’ve spent years researching and fine-tuning their recipes and processes to make the best bread possible—loaves that are full of taste yet equally full of nutrition.

Last Morsel—Reliving History through Food in Burlington

Pamela Hunt | May 20, 2015 | Community & History

tour group on St. George Street, Burlington VT

I swirled the creamy beans, sweet chunks of zucchini, and crunchy corn niblets in the last of the lemon-herb vinaigrette at the bottom of my dish. This salad had a story to tell, and I was hungry to hear it. Lucky for me, I was in the right place: Sugarsnap restaurant at the Echo Center, the first stop on the Burlington Edible History Tour.

Randall Cattle

Vermont’s Official State Heritage Breed

Meg Lucas | August 20, 2013 | Community & History

Randall cattle grazing

At the beginning of the 20th century, as Halley’s Comet graced Vermont skies, Samuel Randall could be found tending a herd of lineback cattle on his farm in Sunderland, Vermont. The type of cattle he kept had fallen out of favor as farmers began selectively breeding for specific traits and standardization. But over decades—until the 1980s—and in virtual isolation, Samuel and his son Everett unknowingly preserved this “landrace” herd.

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What we do

Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape ties into larger questions of sustainability and the future of our food supply.