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2013

Last Morsel—A Boost for On-Farm Slaughter

Caroline Abels | August 20, 2013 | Commentary

A carcus being cut up

Traditionally, farm animals in Vermont were slaughtered and butchered outside, in the open air. Today, all animals that are sold as meat must be slaughtered and processed in inspected facilities. But some Vermonters who raise animals for their own personal consumption prefer on-farm slaughter to taking their critters to an unfamiliar slaughterhouse.

Farmers' Kitchen—Grass=Solar Energy=Good Meat

Beth Whiting | August 20, 2013 | Fall '13 | Issue twenty-six

Bruce Hennessey, Beth Whiting, and their children

My husband, Bruce Hennessey, and I moved to an end-of-the-road, hilltop farm in Huntington in 1999 for a “close-to-the-mountains” farming opportunity. The hilltop nature of our 136 acres made it challenging for growing crops or making hay (steep, too many rocks, some wet areas), so grazing livestock seemed like the answer to keeping the pastures open, fertilized, and healthy.

Cannibalizing our Compatriots

Sean Buchanan | August 20, 2013 | Commentary

Packing room with crates

Vermont has big farms and little farms, organic and conventional growers, pasture-based and feedlot operations, old farmers and young farmers, entrepreneurs and large agribusinesses. In these Green Mountains and across this country we have a complex food production system, with each agricultural business doing what it can to stay viable and profitable.

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