• Letter to Readers
  • Letter to Readers

    It was a day like today in June of 2007 that we published the first print issue of Vermont’s Local Banquet magazine. The word localvore had newly been coined and folks were engaged in localvore challenges in an effort to reduce the distance food travelled, thus the carbon footprint, and to support a growing farming economy.

    Read more

0
Shares

2011

Spring Cartoon—Localvore Picnic

Leah Wittenberg | June 10, 2013 | Spring '11 | Issue sixteen

Localvore Picnic Cartoon

If you go out in the woods today, you're in for a big suprise...

Packing Local Lunches 101

| September 01, 2011 | Community & History

Cartoon by Leah Wittenberg

Packing your child’s lunch every day can be a challenge. Below are some tips for cutting down on costs, time, and the energy you put into your child’s brown bag lunch—and adding some locally grown goods!

Set the Table with Sweet Potatoes

| September 01, 2011 | Set the Table

Sweet Potato

In prehistoric cave sites in Peru, scientists have found remains of sweet potatoes dating back to the dawn of agriculture 10,000 years ago. It is one of the oldest vegetables grown by humans. Yet even with that amount of history in every velvety, sensuous mouthful, the sweet potato is also a plant of the future, and may be a very important plant indeed for Vermont’s future. We are witnessing the arrival and adaptation of a new staple food crop to the Northeast—a rare and exciting event.

Crop Mobsters

Helen Labun | September 01, 2011 | Community & History

Crop Mob

Barley is furry. It is, in the eyes of Nick Cowles, “…golden and beautiful and furry…and it might tickle.”

Nick was preparing a group of Green Mountain Crop Mob volunteers to enter his fields at Shelburne Orchards this past July. He was responding to a question about appropriate clothes for that morning’s work. The furry warning, and a gesture to the bathroom (recently cleaned in our honor), were all we needed before setting off through the orchards toward the five acres of barley we’d signed on to weed that morning.

Hooping it Up

Lisa Holderness | September 01, 2011 | Garden Pathways

Hoophouse at Fertile Fields Farm, Westmoreland, NH

For much of the summer, the sun rises too early for even early birds to see it. But you probably noticed the nights arriving earlier when August rolled around. Perhaps you walked outside at dusk and felt the absence of the swallows. By the time this article hits the stands in September, you’ve probably had your first light frost(s). Maybe even a killing frost, although with climate change it’s all less predictable now.

Having Both Lives

Farming and Writing in Vermont before 1972

Julia Shipley | September 01, 2011 | Community & History

Farming and Writing in Vermont

Why anybody would want to be either a farmer or a poet when there were spools turning in factories was beyond the grasp of the old man. That his grandson should desire to be both was almost enough to bring on a stroke.”

According to the grandson’s biographer, “Determined in his course, Robert laid the whole matter before his grandfather. He would have a farm, live on it, produce his food with his own labor, and write poetry.”

Classroom, Cafeteria, Community

Richard Berkfield | September 01, 2011 | Community & History

Katherine Gillespie, Farm to school program manager for Post Oil Solutions, plants lettuce seedlings with Brattleboro area middle school students in  their new school garden.

From the First Lady to the USDA and Governor Peter Shumlin to celebrity chef Jaime Oliver, there is a growing national interest in improving the health and nutrition of our schoolchildren. Vermont will be among the last states to appear on Oliver’s Food Revolution, a television program meant to save America’s health by helping kids and adults change the way they eat, but perhaps that’s because our state has been leading the way by developing Farm to School (FTS) programming for more than a decade.

Humane Heft

Caroline Abels | September 01, 2011 | Food Systems

Royal Laroque outside the entrance to his slaughterhouse

Chalk up another “first” for Vermont.

The state was the first to outlaw slavery, the first to legalize civil unions, and the first to pass a single-payer health care law, among other singular achievements. It may not be as significant, but the fact that Vermont recently became the first state to require local slaughterhouses to file a written humane handling plan falls in line with the state’s tradition of leading the way on moral issues.

[12 3 4 5  >>  

What we do

Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape ties into larger questions of sustainability and the future of our food supply. 

Subscribe to Our Newsletter

Sign up here to receive monthly Local Banquet news in your inbox.