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2014

Why Mid-Scale Farming Is Important in Vermont

Ela Chapin and Liz Gleason | May 23, 2014 | Food Systems & Policy

Bags of veggies from Pete's Greens

Vermont’s vibrant farm economy is made up of all sizes, scales, and types of farms—something that’s beneficial, because a high diversity of scale and business model is critical to improving the sustainability and resiliency of our food system. Yet within Vermont (and outside Vermont) there is a particular fondness for the smallest scale farms.

Cafeteria Cooking: A New Era in Vermont Schools

Bonnie North | May 23, 2014 | Issues Archive

Karyl Kent, David Horner, and Alison Forrest

We all know that “You can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make him drink.” Similarly, as any parent knows, you can put good, healthy food on kids’ lunch plates but that’s no guarantee they’ll actually eat it. But who can blame them? Consider what they’re used to.

Farm-ecology

How one Vermont farm is addressing climate change and pollinator loss.

Nancy Hayden | May 23, 2014 | On the Farm

Apple blossoms at The Farm Between

My husband, John, reminds me every so often that in a world of seven billion people it is a privilege to own land. This is a good thing to contemplate as I stack brush and run it through the wood chipper. After a long winter, I’m already feeling the ache in my back and shoulders from only a few hours of work.

Mushroom Grower, Man of Peace

Amir Hebib’s journey from war-torn Bosnia to the markets of Burlington

Andrew Simon | May 23, 2014 | Issues Archive

Amir Hebib

Sitting with Amir Hebib in his living room in Colchester, sipping herbal tea made from his own spearmint and lemon balm, you get a sense of peace, of refuge. But when you talk to Amir about his life, you discover that the road to this peaceful Vermont home has been a difficult, war-blasted one.

Getting One’s Goat

New farm connects newly arrived Americans with fresh goat meat

Suzanne Podhaizer | May 23, 2014 | Issues Archive

Chuda Dhaurali with his goats

Although Vermont is known for its goat’s milk cheeses, it hasn’t always been an easy place to find local goat meat. To acquire a goat, Chuda Dhaurali used to trek to Boston or New Hampshire from his home in Burlington, spending money on gas and occasionally getting lost in the process. Sometimes “it would take the whole day,” he says.

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What we do

Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape ties into larger questions of sustainability and the future of our food supply.