• Publishers' Note Fall 2017

    Publishers' Note Fall 2017

    As the days shorten and the temperatures begin their march south, here in Vermont we are so fortunate to experience Mother Nature’s annual display. It’s always been our favorite time of year; full of abundance from the summer and with a hint of the bittersweet knowledge that winter is next up on the docket.

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  • It’s Time for Puttin’ It Up

    It’s Time for Puttin’ It Up

    You may remember your mother or grandmother’s stories about “puttin’ up” tomatoes or green beans every summer.

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  • Set the Table with Bison

    Set the Table with Bison

    While the horned, haunched American bison usually evokes backdrops of western plains and peaks, it also inhabits the outskirts of humble Rutland, Vermont.

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  • People, Places, and Plates

    People, Places, and Plates

    You know how some buildings, even when they’re empty, seem as if their history is still alive, shimmering through the veil of the now? That’s how many people in Williamsville, Vermont, a bucolic community situated along Rock River, saw their old general store, sitting empty since 2007, after 185 years of continuous operation.

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  • Turn Summer’s Vegetables Into Winter’s Flavor Bombs

    Turn Summer’s Vegetables Into Winter’s Flavor Bombs

    If you garden or own a membership in a CSA, you know high summer through autumn as the time of year when everything explodes, and the piles of produce accumulating on kitchen counters, mudroom floors, erupting from crisper drawers, and occupying idle porch swings have begun to impede normal daily routine.

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  • Bringing Back the Local Grain Economy

    Bringing Back the Local Grain Economy

    Blair Marvin and Andrew Heyn of Elmore Mountain Bread have been baking together for 14 years. They’ve spent years researching and fine-tuning their recipes and processes to make the best bread possible—loaves that are full of taste yet equally full of nutrition.

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  • Farm-to-Fashion  in Sky Like Snow

    Farm-to-Fashion in Sky Like Snow

    “Farm to Table” is a familiar term—the distribution of goods from local farms to local communities that enables us to know where our food comes from and encourages the support of our producers. I hadn’t much entertained the idea of “Farm to Fashion,” hadn’t really considered the depth of the phrase, until I met fiber artist Hannah Regier at her home and studio in Athens, Vermont.

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  • Vermont Young Farmers Coalition

    Vermont Young Farmers Coalition

    Our state chapter, the Vermont Young Farmers Coalition (VYFC), engages both farm owners and employees who are putting down roots here. VYFC supports the national organization in their mission and projects, and engages with young farmers across Vermont, connecting them with fellow farmers and organizations.

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  • Stay Rooted in Vermont with Local Food

    Stay Rooted in Vermont with Local Food

    If you live in Vermont, chances are that at some time during the year you’ll be eating food that was either grown or processed (or both) in Vermont.

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  • Farmers' Kitchen—Singing River Farm’s Flint Corn Cornbread

    Farmers' Kitchen—Singing River Farm’s Flint Corn Cornbread

    As farmers, we try to hold a perspective that we are only the current stewards of land that has been, and will be, cared for by a continuum of people for millennia before and after us. Growing flint corn and saving its seed each year helps us maintain that perspective.

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  • The Mad Farmer, Flying the Flag of Rough Branch, Secedes from the Union

    The Mad Farmer, Flying the Flag of Rough Branch, Secedes from the Union

    From the union of power and money,
    From the union of power and secrecy,
    From the union of government and science,
    From the union of government and art,
    From the union of science and money,
    From the union of genius and war,
    From the union of outer space and inner vacuity,
    The Mad Farmer walks quietly away.

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Articles tagged with: Summer

Publishers' Note—Summer 2016

| May 24, 2016

Publishers' Note—Summer 2016

Vermont has a long history of leading the nation in enacting principled laws aimed at promoting the common good.

Publishers' Note

Written by Meg Lucas | May 26, 2015

Anise hyssop

When they harnessed fire, by some accounts more than 1.5 million years ago, our distant ancestors changed the course of their evolution and, ultimately, ours. Not only was light and warmth brought into their lives, but the act of cooking food is thought to have increased brain size and put us on the path to becoming Homo Sapiens.

Publishers' Note Summer 2014

| May 23, 2014

Rice plants

We’re turning 7 this summer! It’s amazing to think that Local Banquet has had the privilege of chronicling the local and sustainable food movement here in the state as it has grown up. Of course we owe a tremendous amount to the folks who, in the 1970s, came to Vermont to start the work and give us a solid foundation: knowledge passed from one generation to the next.

Publishers' Note Summer 2008

| June 01, 2008

Jars of pickles

As the weather warms here in Vermont, we get to experience the promise of another growing season. But many people in our communities struggle with food security, unable to get access to Vermont’s amazing bounty. Summer is a good time to think of these community members. Here are some ways that we can make a difference.

Grow Where You Work

Written by Charlie Nardozzi | May 25, 2016

Northeast Kingdom Community Action – Barton

Across the country, employees are realizing the benefits of gardening where they work. And as company wellness programs proliferate, employers are looking for creative ways to engage their staff.

Polyphony in the Garden

Written by Tatiana Schreiber | May 26, 2015

Hummingbird moth on bergamot

When I work in the garden, surrounded by vegetables, flowering plants, and herbs, with several species of bees buzzing in the big, purple, flowering clusters of anise hyssop at the ends of all the beds, and a breeze fluttering the leaves of the maples and oaks in the woods nearby, I sense polyphony at work in the natural world.

Set the Table with Seaberries

Written by Vera Chang | May 23, 2014

seaberries

I’d never actually seen a sea buckthorn plant or eaten any of its berries until I moved to Vermont. Already familiar with sea buckthorn in my skincare products, I was inspired to learn more. And when I did: zing, zest, tang! I was struck by sea buckthorn berries’ complex, passionfruit, citrus-like flavor. It was like nothing I’ve tasted.

Set the Table with Garlic Scapes

Written by Claire Fitts Georges | July 03, 2013

Garlic Scapes

Garlic scapes are one of those totally edible and delicious things that most people don’t even know exist. Every spring, hardneck varieties of garlic (having overwintered but not ready to harvest until July) send up a curlycue stem with a bulbil up top. The bulbil is sort of a mini bulb that can grow new garlic in a couple years or just be eaten like garlic right now.

Editor's Note Summer 2012

Written by Caroline Abels | June 01, 2012

Son of Silas Butson, Farm Security Administration client, helping to cut the hay. Athens, Vermont; photo by Jack Delano, 1941.

Not everyone gets to eat popcorn popped in pork fat. But there it was in a big pot, greeting four sweaty interns after our morning removing a winter’s worth of bedded pack from a hoop house and doing other tasks too numerous to mention. The popcorn was mighty tasty, and eager hands grabbed for it around the communal table.

Editor's Note Summer 2011

Written by Caroline Abels | June 01, 2011

Tractor in Field

It’s practically a requirement for any journalistic publication (such as this one) to keep tabs on what’s new and exciting in the field it covers. Not only is it the publication’s responsibility to keep readers up to date, it also makes for good copy. Journalists find it hard to write about “what hasn’t changed since yesterday,” even though the fact that something hasn’t changed is often, in its own quiet way, newsworthy. Journalists and editors get a frisson of excitement when something new(s) crosses their path.

Editor's Note Summer 2010

| June 01, 2010

Sunflower

There’s so much about modern American culture that our farmer ancestors could never have imagined. The popular Facebook game FarmVille comes to mind. That’s where you sit at your computer “harvesting” corn and squash from your virtual farm while studying spreadsheets to make sure your farm is profitable. Yes… your farm… your computer farm.

Llama Beans for Your Beds

Written by Susan Houston | June 01, 2008

llamas

At our small hilltop farm here in Craftsbury Common, the melting winter snow recently revealed piles of one of Vermont’s gardening treasures: llama manure. Also known as “llamanure” or “llama beans,” llama manure has become the fertilizer of choice for many friends and neighbors of llama farms. Thus, on a recent bright spring morning, our neighbors arrived in pick-ups, shovels in hand, ready for the spring ritual of scooping poop provided by our small herd here at Maple Leaf Llamas.

Editor's Note Summer 2017

Written by Bonnie North | May 15, 2017

Cutting hay, Windsor County 1937; photo by Arthur Rothstein, Farm Security Administration (Library of Congress).

Greetings!

With this issue, I am stepping into the position of editor here at Local Banquet. Before I “retired” and moved from Maryland to Vermont I published a monthly called Baltimore Eats.

Set the Table with…Crickets

Written by Pamela Hunt | May 25, 2016

Table with baked goods

Like many new fathers, Stephen Swanson wanted to do something to make his children’s world a better place. After reading a 2013 report by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization about the health and environmental benefits of eating insects, he told his wife, Jen, that he wanted to start a cricket farm in their Williston garage.

Set the Table with Rabbit

Written by Katie Spring Katie Sullivan | May 26, 2015

Sarah Ouellette of Silver Ridge Rabbitry

I circulated the room with a tray of hors d’oeuvres, weaving through bridesmaids, groomsmen, and guests. The social hour was winding down, and by my fifth or sixth pass through the crowd, I knew who the vegetarians were—who to offer the stuffed mushrooms to, who to pass by with the pulled pork.

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What we do

A quarterly magazine devoted to covering local food, sustainable farming, and the many people building the Vermont food system.

Vermont's Local Banquet Magazine illuminates the connections between local food and Vermont communities. Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape is changing as the localvore movement shapes what is grown and raised here.

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