• Publishers' Note Fall 2017

    Publishers' Note Fall 2017

    As the days shorten and the temperatures begin their march south, here in Vermont we are so fortunate to experience Mother Nature’s annual display. It’s always been our favorite time of year; full of abundance from the summer and with a hint of the bittersweet knowledge that winter is next up on the docket.

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  • It’s Time for Puttin’ It Up

    It’s Time for Puttin’ It Up

    You may remember your mother or grandmother’s stories about “puttin’ up” tomatoes or green beans every summer.

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  • Set the Table with Bison

    Set the Table with Bison

    While the horned, haunched American bison usually evokes backdrops of western plains and peaks, it also inhabits the outskirts of humble Rutland, Vermont.

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  • People, Places, and Plates

    People, Places, and Plates

    You know how some buildings, even when they’re empty, seem as if their history is still alive, shimmering through the veil of the now? That’s how many people in Williamsville, Vermont, a bucolic community situated along Rock River, saw their old general store, sitting empty since 2007, after 185 years of continuous operation.

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  • Turn Summer’s Vegetables Into Winter’s Flavor Bombs

    Turn Summer’s Vegetables Into Winter’s Flavor Bombs

    If you garden or own a membership in a CSA, you know high summer through autumn as the time of year when everything explodes, and the piles of produce accumulating on kitchen counters, mudroom floors, erupting from crisper drawers, and occupying idle porch swings have begun to impede normal daily routine.

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  • Bringing Back the Local Grain Economy

    Bringing Back the Local Grain Economy

    Blair Marvin and Andrew Heyn of Elmore Mountain Bread have been baking together for 14 years. They’ve spent years researching and fine-tuning their recipes and processes to make the best bread possible—loaves that are full of taste yet equally full of nutrition.

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  • Farm-to-Fashion  in Sky Like Snow

    Farm-to-Fashion in Sky Like Snow

    “Farm to Table” is a familiar term—the distribution of goods from local farms to local communities that enables us to know where our food comes from and encourages the support of our producers. I hadn’t much entertained the idea of “Farm to Fashion,” hadn’t really considered the depth of the phrase, until I met fiber artist Hannah Regier at her home and studio in Athens, Vermont.

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  • Vermont Young Farmers Coalition

    Vermont Young Farmers Coalition

    Our state chapter, the Vermont Young Farmers Coalition (VYFC), engages both farm owners and employees who are putting down roots here. VYFC supports the national organization in their mission and projects, and engages with young farmers across Vermont, connecting them with fellow farmers and organizations.

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  • Stay Rooted in Vermont with Local Food

    Stay Rooted in Vermont with Local Food

    If you live in Vermont, chances are that at some time during the year you’ll be eating food that was either grown or processed (or both) in Vermont.

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  • Farmers' Kitchen—Singing River Farm’s Flint Corn Cornbread

    Farmers' Kitchen—Singing River Farm’s Flint Corn Cornbread

    As farmers, we try to hold a perspective that we are only the current stewards of land that has been, and will be, cared for by a continuum of people for millennia before and after us. Growing flint corn and saving its seed each year helps us maintain that perspective.

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  • The Mad Farmer, Flying the Flag of Rough Branch, Secedes from the Union

    The Mad Farmer, Flying the Flag of Rough Branch, Secedes from the Union

    From the union of power and money,
    From the union of power and secrecy,
    From the union of government and science,
    From the union of government and art,
    From the union of science and money,
    From the union of genius and war,
    From the union of outer space and inner vacuity,
    The Mad Farmer walks quietly away.

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Articles tagged with: Fall

Farmers' Kitchen—Tomatillo Tamworths

Written by Mari Omland and Laura Olsen | September 01, 2011

Mari Omland and Laura Olsen Green Mountain Girls Farm

Yankee and Doodle squealed in the crate in the back of the Subaru. We were as shocked by the piglets’ lung capacity as we were by the fact that we, two former vegetarians, were about to start raising and selling meat! Once we got them home, they settled in quickly in the barn, scratching against the hand-hewn beams and eventually burying their noses in sweet-smelling hay.

Packing Local Lunches 101

| September 01, 2011

Cartoon by Leah Wittenberg

Packing your child’s lunch every day can be a challenge. Below are some tips for cutting down on costs, time, and the energy you put into your child’s brown bag lunch—and adding some locally grown goods!

Set the Table with Sweet Potatoes

| September 01, 2011

Sweet Potato

In prehistoric cave sites in Peru, scientists have found remains of sweet potatoes dating back to the dawn of agriculture 10,000 years ago. It is one of the oldest vegetables grown by humans. Yet even with that amount of history in every velvety, sensuous mouthful, the sweet potato is also a plant of the future, and may be a very important plant indeed for Vermont’s future. We are witnessing the arrival and adaptation of a new staple food crop to the Northeast—a rare and exciting event.

Crop Mobsters

Written by Helen Labun Jordan | September 01, 2011

Crop Mob

Barley is furry. It is, in the eyes of Nick Cowles, “…golden and beautiful and furry…and it might tickle.”

Nick was preparing a group of Green Mountain Crop Mob volunteers to enter his fields at Shelburne Orchards this past July. He was responding to a question about appropriate clothes for that morning’s work. The furry warning, and a gesture to the bathroom (recently cleaned in our honor), were all we needed before setting off through the orchards toward the five acres of barley we’d signed on to weed that morning.

Hooping it Up

Written by Lisa Holderness | September 01, 2011

Hoophouse at Fertile Fields Farm, Westmoreland, NH

For much of the summer, the sun rises too early for even early birds to see it. But you probably noticed the nights arriving earlier when August rolled around. Perhaps you walked outside at dusk and felt the absence of the swallows. By the time this article hits the stands in September, you’ve probably had your first light frost(s). Maybe even a killing frost, although with climate change it’s all less predictable now.

Having Both Lives

Farming and Writing in Vermont before 1972

Written by Julia Shipley | September 01, 2011

Farming and Writing in Vermont

Why anybody would want to be either a farmer or a poet when there were spools turning in factories was beyond the grasp of the old man. That his grandson should desire to be both was almost enough to bring on a stroke.”

According to the grandson’s biographer, “Determined in his course, Robert laid the whole matter before his grandfather. He would have a farm, live on it, produce his food with his own labor, and write poetry.”

Classroom, Cafeteria, Community

Written by Richard Berkfield | September 01, 2011

Katherine Gillespie, Farm to school program manager for Post Oil Solutions, plants lettuce seedlings with Brattleboro area middle school students in  their new school garden.

From the First Lady to the USDA and Governor Peter Shumlin to celebrity chef Jaime Oliver, there is a growing national interest in improving the health and nutrition of our schoolchildren. Vermont will be among the last states to appear on Oliver’s Food Revolution, a television program meant to save America’s health by helping kids and adults change the way they eat, but perhaps that’s because our state has been leading the way by developing Farm to School (FTS) programming for more than a decade.

Humane Heft

Written by Caroline Abels | September 01, 2011

Royal Laroque outside the entrance to his slaughterhouse

Chalk up another “first” for Vermont.

The state was the first to outlaw slavery, the first to legalize civil unions, and the first to pass a single-payer health care law, among other singular achievements. It may not be as significant, but the fact that Vermont recently became the first state to require local slaughterhouses to file a written humane handling plan falls in line with the state’s tradition of leading the way on moral issues.

Learning at the Market

Written by Carolyn Grodinsky | September 01, 2011

Lisa Mase of Harmonized Cookery

Shop, Learn, Connect— that’s our market’s slogan, and this summer we emphasized the second word “learn” with 15 teaching demonstrations held during market hours. Intended to match the spirit of the market (local, seasonal, and affordable), the demonstrations helped customers learn how to preserve foods to enjoy year-round, how to prepare a variety of dishes from local produce, and how to stretch their food dollar. We partnered with Montpelier-area chefs, our market vendors, and food educators to lead these almost-weekly demonstrations.

Vermont Wine & Spirits Guide

| September 01, 2011

Vermont Wine & Spirits Guide

Vermont is home to a thriving spirits industry. Our in-state distillers are producing a wide variety of products from vodka and maple liqueurs to gin and rye whiskey. Many of them are winning national acclaim and international awards for their fine quality and appealing flavor. A number of the distilleries have their own tasting rooms where the products they make can be sampled and purchased. You may also find local distillers at farmers’ markets, special events, or festivals around the state.

A Tasty Tour

Written by Matthew Burke | September 01, 2011

Tour de Farms

Year One: A Good Cause. Managing our farm, my wife and I try to respect a Sunday off, cultivating diversity in our lives as we do in our fields. So in September 2008, a neighbor and I chose to ride the first annual "Tour de Farms," an Addison County bike-to-farms ride of various lengths, organized by Rural Vermont, the Addison County Relocalization Network (ACORN), and the Vermont Bicycle and Pedestrian Coalition. Having chosen the 30-mile loop, the rolling hills of Addison County on that clear morning were stunning.

Thinking Outside the Bordeaux

Written by Claire Fitts Georges | September 01, 2011

Charles Dodge

Folks have been fermenting things for as long as there have been reasons to get drunk. Okay, crop preservation was probably more of a reason for fermentation, but I’m sure that inebriation was an added perk for many early consumers. Before refrigeration was an option, people needed to either dry, ferment, or culture foods to carry them through the lean months. When Vermont was more rural, each farm needed to produce food for their own winter larders, so fermented fruit, honey, and maple drinks were common.

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A quarterly magazine devoted to covering local food, sustainable farming, and the many people building the Vermont food system.

Vermont's Local Banquet Magazine illuminates the connections between local food and Vermont communities. Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape is changing as the localvore movement shapes what is grown and raised here.

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Home Tags: Fall