Last Morsel

The Waterville House

Written by Katie Powers | August 22, 2014

The Waterville House

Three summers ago, Jacob and I moved back to Vermont from the southeastern corner of Idaho. Tired of the long Teton Valley winter, we’d stared longingly at the March photo on our Vermont Life calendar: a tractor crawling along its farm beneath Mount Mansfield.

Last Morsel—Turnip on Top

Written by Caroline Abels | May 26, 2016

Gilfeather Turnip

Just when you think politics has reached its lowest point of decomposition, a vegetable comes along to reaffirm your faith in responsive government.

Last Morsel—Wrap Local

Written by Caroline Abels | November 25, 2015

Bees Wrap

Those of us who eat local food, diligently compost our kitchen scraps,  and use natural cleaners on our kitchen counters may feel a pang of guilt whenever we reach for a piece of plastic wrap or a plastic container in which to store our food.

What Is Fresh?

Written by Helen Labun | August 25, 2015

vine ripe tomatoes

Ask Vermont food enthusiasts what they love about local food and most of us say, “It’s fresh.” The link between fresh flavor and local food is so strong that the terms often appear as one: “Fresh local food!”

Last Morsel—Farming Solo

Written by Ryan Demarest | February 13, 2015

Ryan Demarest

This past summer I embarked on my first foray into agriculture on a small piece of land in Waterbury. While I took some time to get settled, by mid-season I was attending a farmers’ market, selling to various restaurants and stores, and maintaining a small farm stand.

Farmer Wordplay: Harvest vs. Slaughter

Written by Katie Spring | November 17, 2014


With both hands, I reach into the crate of chickens. “I’m sorry!” I say to the chicken as it flaps in my less-than-confident grasp. The butcher just showed me how to properly handle a bird: two hands on their legs, chest down, and pick up. They won’t flap this way. I put the bird’s chest on the ground until it calms and hand it to the butcher.

Last Morsel—From Farm to Spa

Written by Gretchen Gross | November 28, 2013

Spa salts

As Cynthea Wight Hausman was growing up—first on a commune in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and later on her family’s New Hampshire homestead—fresh and organic foods were plentiful. In her teens, Cynthea made her own remedies and lotions from herbs and flowers gathered from the woods and gardens surrounding her home.

Last Morsel—On Potlucks

Written by Sylvia Fagin | September 01, 2010

Potluck Table

I realize that the potluck is the quintessential Vermont meal: Yankee frugality combined with communal creativity. When my partner and I combined households and invited everyone we knew to celebrate with us, there was no way we were going to cook for 75 people. Friends brought spinach dip, chocolate chip cookies, and strawberries straight from their garden. That was the best kind of potluck—not just because we saved ourselves a whole lot of money and labor, but because everyone brought a little bit of their home to christen ours.

Last Morsel—Carnivore with a Caveat

Written by Caitlin Gildrien | December 01, 2009

Cow looking out of barn

I stopped eating meat at the impassioned age of 14, when a biology teacher showed a film called Diet for a New America, which graphically described the many and various evils of the modern meat industry. I dumped that day’s turkey sandwich in the garbage and didn’t touch meat again for nine years. My reasoning was three-fold: I believed that vegetarianism was better for my body, better for the planet, and decreased the total suffering of the world. I knew that certain responsible farming practices could, in theory, mitigate or overcome most of my objections to meat, but I’d never seen them in practice and didn’t know how to judge them or trust their claims.


Written by Katie Sullivan | August 17, 2016

goat illustration by Gabriel Tempesta

I began farming in 2008, moving from books to hands-on experience raising crops, sheep, dairy goats, and poultry.

Last Morsel—A Slow Tan

Written by Caroline Abels | February 10, 2016


Sheep aren’t raised for their skins, but the soft pelts that are a byproduct of meat and wool production are a fluffy reward for farmers and homesteaders who spend many hours tending their flocks.

Last Morsel—Reliving History through Food in Burlington

Written by Pamela Hunt | May 20, 2015

tour group on St. George Street, Burlington VT

I swirled the creamy beans, sweet chunks of zucchini, and crunchy corn niblets in the last of the lemon-herb vinaigrette at the bottom of my dish. This salad had a story to tell, and I was hungry to hear it. Lucky for me, I was in the right place: Sugarsnap restaurant at the Echo Center, the first stop on the Burlington Edible History Tour.

Last Morsel—A Boost for On-Farm Slaughter

Written by Caroline Abels | August 20, 2013

A carcus being cut up

Traditionally, farm animals in Vermont were slaughtered and butchered outside, in the open air. Today, all animals that are sold as meat must be slaughtered and processed in inspected facilities. But some Vermonters who raise animals for their own personal consumption prefer on-farm slaughter to taking their critters to an unfamiliar slaughterhouse.

Last Morsel—The Family Car as Solar Dehydrator

Written by Chris Sims | July 03, 2013

Spotted wing drosophila

All summer long, I feast like a queen from the garden, but never lose sight that fall is coming, and we’ll still want to eat. My husband and I therefore freeze, ferment, can, and dehydrate food for winter, and since one of our goals is to avoid the use of fossil fuels to prepare or store our food, we often favor dehydrating.

Spare the Turkeys


| June 11, 2013

Thankful turkeys

We asked our readers for Thanksgiving menu suggestions. Pat McGovern from the Upper Valley Localvores responded with this turkeyless feast. Here's a way to celebrate the harvest and give thanks and make a few turkeys happy at the same time.

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What we do

A quarterly magazine devoted to covering local food, sustainable farming, and the many people building the Vermont food system.

Vermont's Local Banquet Magazine illuminates the connections between local food and Vermont communities. Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape is changing as the localvore movement shapes what is grown and raised here.


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