Henry Homeyer

Henry Homeyer

Henry Homeyer is the author of four gardening books and, due in September from Bunker Hill Publishing, a children’s chapter book: a fantasy-adventure called Wobar and the Quest for the Magic Calumet. 

Putting the Garden to Bed

Written by Henry Homeyer | August 19, 2013

Various

There are many distractions at this time of year, whether school or watching football or catching up on work and e-mail after an August vacation. But one thing’s for sure: autumn—and winter—are coming, and we need to put our gardens to bed. A little extra work now will help us garden even better next year.

Storing Your Harvest

Winter and Beyond

Written by Henry Homeyer | August 30, 2012

Storing

Until the mid 1950s, gardeners often slaved away at canning— or putting into jars—as much food from the garden as possible. Tomatoes, beans, carrots, peas…you name it, our grannies canned it. This was a time when fresh produce at the grocery store was expensive in winter and often limp and bedraggled.

The 9' x 12' Vegetable Garden

Some basics on how to start a plot of your own

Written by Henry Homeyer | March 01, 2009

Henry

If you’re able to devote 15 minutes a day to gardening and are willing to give up a piece of your lawn roughly the size of the parking space for your car, you can grow a significant amount of good food—food that is organic, food that is tasty, food that is healthy. During World War II, Americans started “victory gardens,” growing up to 40 percent of their fresh produce. In these tough economic times, it again makes sense for us to grow some of our own food.

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A quarterly magazine devoted to covering local food, sustainable farming, and the many people building the Vermont food system.

Vermont's Local Banquet Magazine illuminates the connections between local food and Vermont communities. Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape is changing as the localvore movement shapes what is grown and raised here.

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