Bonnie Hudspeth

Bonnie Hudspeth

Bonnie Hudspeth is a master’s candidate in the Environmental Studies Program at Antioch University New England in Keene, N.H.  Her Individualized Program combines the disciplines of environmental research, journalism, and community advocacy to help augment the sustainability of communities.

Beyond Maple Syrup

Vermont entrepreneurs are using maple sap in new ways—and waiting to see how the climate changes

Written by Bonnie Hudspeth | December 01, 2007

sugaring

On Sunday mornings during my childhood in Burlington, my father would make heaping stacks of pancakes on the wood stove. My sister and I eagerly awaited the moment when we would pour dark amber maple syrup on our plates to make our doughy boats float in a pool of sweetness. As a child, I took for granted that maple syrup, that quintessential Vermont ingredient, was an important part of the culture in my state. But today, a shift in ecological conditions thought to be triggered by global warming is pressuring ecosystems to move northward. If the southerly range of sugar maples migrates northward into Canada, a vital part of Vermont’s culture and economy will relocate with these valuable trees.

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A quarterly magazine devoted to covering local food, sustainable farming, and the many people building the Vermont food system.

Vermont's Local Banquet Magazine illuminates the connections between local food and Vermont communities. Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape is changing as the localvore movement shapes what is grown and raised here.

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