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2016

A Plucky Issue

Why raising ducks in Vermont has its challenges—but also some rewards

Written by Katie Sullivan | November 24, 2015

Ducks on pasture

When I was young, we visited my grandmother in Haverhill, Massachusetts every few months. She never cooked a meal with less than a cup of cream or a pound of butter. But of all of the rich and sumptuous meals I enjoyed at her house, roast duck is the one I remember best.

Vermont Apples: Lost and Found

Written by Nancy Hayden | August 17, 2016

Shacksbury team scouting roadside apples in Ripton

Roaming the hills and back roads in Vermont at this time of year, you find plenty of apple trees. Most are wild trees, also called seedling trees, spread by wildlife or from dropped apples.

Sharing the Whole Earth Perspective

Organic farmers in the WWOOF program pass down the values of the local food movement

Written by Amber Newman | May 25, 2016

Jovin Ehrt, James Daly, and Meg Kirkham harvesting flint corn at Singing River Farm

Singing River Farm in Rockingham belongs to a global network of organic farmers who welcome strangers into their lives for an educational and cultural exchange. The network, World Wide Opportunities on Organic Farms, is better known as WWOOF, and the people who visit farms are known as WWOOF’ers.

Home for Supper

Remembering Lewis Hill

Written by Nancy Hayden | February 09, 2016

Lewis Hill

Ask a longtime Vermont fruit grower or gardener about Lewis Hill and they’ll probably tell you how he inspired and nurtured their love of growing fruit. Maybe he introduced them to uncommon fruits such as black currants and elderberry.

A Touching Separation

Written by Caroline Abels | November 25, 2015

Highland cattle

For the past eight years, calves at Greenfield Highland Beef in Greensboro and Plainfield have been permanently separated from their mothers through the process of “nose-to-nose weaning,” or “fenceline weaning.”

Regenerative Agriculture

Taking Root in Vermont

Written by Katie Spring | August 17, 2016

Clover

In 2012, new farmers Jesse McDougall and his wife, Cally, decided not to spray the kinds of chemical pesticides and fertilizers that had long been applied to their hayfields in Shaftsbury.

Unexpected Treasures

John Miller and The Old Schoolhouse Plantery

Written by Tatiana Schreiber | May 25, 2016

John and Diane Miller of Old Schoolhouse Plantery

The one lesson John Miller says he always remembers from his years at Writtle Agricultural College in Great Britain is this: “Any fool can grow it; the trick is to sell it.”

A Rising Collaboration

The Beer and Bread Connection

Written by Pamela Hunt | February 09, 2016

Freshly baked bread coming out of the oven at Elmore Mountain Bread;

Once upon a time, in cobblestoned villages across Europe, brewers and bakers depended on each other, trading beer and spent grains for loaves of bread made with those grains. But on our side of the Atlantic, this relationship has largely been lacking.

Ambassador Farmers

Vermont growers share their skills with farmers around the world

Written by Bonnie North | November 25, 2015

A local Agricultural Cooperative Association in El Salvador

“These women came down—they call them ‘The Forest Women,’ women who plant on the edge of the mountain’s forests. Some walked for two hours! They’d never attended an educational workshop before…. It was pretty amazing.”

Crafty Cultivation

A Burlington farmer invents machines that ease the burdens of farm labor

Written by Laura Sorkin | August 17, 2016

Rob using the prone weeder

The old adage says, “Necessity is the mother of invention,” but the small farmer’s credo would be a lot more specific: “A sore back will get you scheming for a better way.”

Spreading Joy

There’s a bounty of new butter makers in Vermont

Written by Suzanne Podhaizer | May 26, 2016

Ploughgate butter

What would we do without butter? It’s the magical element that makes croissants possible. Smeared onto dark, German-style bread, it creates a snack hearty enough to power a lumberjack through a busy afternoon.

The Shearer’s Daughter

Written by Helen Whybrow | February 09, 2016

Gwen shearing a sheep

During peak shearing seasons, Gwen often leaves her house at 4 a.m. and doesn’t return until after 10 p.m. Over those long days she might shear more than 100 sheep and drive several hundred miles, barely stopping for a meal. She estimates that annually she drives 40,000 miles and shears 8,000 to 10,000 sheep.

Icing the Apple

Written by Jen Rose Smith | November 25, 2015

Eden Barn

2015 was a banner year for apples. By early October, Vermont’s trees were bowed low with ripe fruit.

Small Acts Bring Permaculture Out of the Backyard and into the Community

Written by Bonnie North | August 17, 2016

Bare root trees ready to plant

On August 28, 2011, when Tropical Storm Irene hit parts of Vermont with almost 10 inches of rain, the waters of the Saxtons River rose up in an uncontrollable torrent of historic proportions.

POP Clubs and the Power of Produce

Written by Carol Stedman | May 26, 2016

POP clubs

POP Club formats can vary, but ours in Hartland is a simple one. When children arrive at the market, they’re invited to join the POP Club.

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What we do

A quarterly magazine devoted to covering local food, sustainable farming, and the many people building the Vermont food system.

Vermont's Local Banquet Magazine illuminates the connections between local food and Vermont communities. Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape is changing as the localvore movement shapes what is grown and raised here.

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