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Along the Route des Vins

Innovation and cooperation have led to success for Québecois winemakers

| November 15, 2016

Grape harvest in Québec

In the first unpredictable weeks of spring, workers at Québec’s Léon Courville vineyard lay the bones of 1,200 tiny bonfires between the vines.

Set the Table with…Figs

Written by Alix O’Meara | August 17, 2016

Figs

Figs may not seem like a Vermont kind of crop—the fruits are more associated with warmer climates. However, one local Vermonter has dug into his Italian roots and has been successfully growing figs for five years.

Set the Table with…Crickets

Written by Pamela Hunt | May 25, 2016

Table with baked goods

Like many new fathers, Stephen Swanson wanted to do something to make his children’s world a better place. After reading a 2013 report by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization about the health and environmental benefits of eating insects, he told his wife, Jen, that he wanted to start a cricket farm in their Williston garage.

Set the Table with Local Oils

Written by Cheryl Herrick | February 09, 2016

Sunflowers in field

Netaka White remembers going to some of the first local food challenges in Vermont—potluck meals to which attendees would bring food that was entirely grown or raised within Vermont, or a 50-mile radius.

New Crops from New Americans

Written by Cheryl Herrick | November 24, 2015

Bitter mellon grower

We eaters and fans of food love to share memories of delicious meals, tell the backstories of where our food came from, and follow the journeys our food has taken. But food itself tells many stories, just by appearing in a time and place.

Set the Table with Garlic

Written by Laura Sorkin | August 24, 2015

Basket of Garlic

If you search the word garlic online, you may end up believing it is the panacea for all that ails us. Garlic was given to soldiers and athletes in ancient Greece to promote vigor.

Set the Table with Rabbit

Written by Katie Spring Katie Sullivan | May 26, 2015

Sarah Ouellette of Silver Ridge Rabbitry

I circulated the room with a tray of hors d’oeuvres, weaving through bridesmaids, groomsmen, and guests. The social hour was winding down, and by my fifth or sixth pass through the crowd, I knew who the vegetarians were—who to offer the stuffed mushrooms to, who to pass by with the pulled pork.

Spring Vinegars

Herbal Infusions for Health and Flavor

Written by Juliette Abigail Carr | February 11, 2015

dandelion, chickweed, burdock, and nettles

As the earth reawakens from winter’s slumber, it takes time for the sun’s warmth to turn the earth over to spring, coaxing new growth out of last year’s seed. The same is true in our bodies: It takes time to transition from the inwardness of winter to spring’s explosion of vitality.

“Don’t Waste that Woodchuck…”

Written by Rose Paul | November 16, 2014

illustration wikimedia.org, Pearson Scott Foresman collection

That’s what I told friends for two weeks after feasting on woodchuck stew. Don’t waste your pesky garden woodchuck—eat it!

Make Your Own Immune-Boosting Cough Syrup

Written by Juliette Abigail Carr | August 22, 2014

Elecampane

With cold season fast approaching and the autumn harvest at hand, consider creating this tasty, family-friendly remedy for winter ailments. As well as relieving those irritating coughs, this homemade cough syrup is a powerful immune booster.

Growing Unusual Veggies

Written by Henry Homeyer | May 23, 2014

Happy Rich and kohlrabi

Just because we live in northern New England doesn’t mean we have to subsist on carrots and potatoes. These familiar vegetables grow well for us despite our cool nights and relatively short summers. But so do tomatoes, a warm-climate vegetable, and other frost-sensitive vegetables like summer squashes, beans, and cukes. What we grow is largely what we know—and what our Grannies grew—but it doesn’t have to be this way.

Think Globally, Dine Locally

Vermont restaurants use nearby ingredients to create far-from-home dishes

Written by MK Bateman | February 21, 2014

Mushroom Polenta at MINT

Last year I was excited when the Burlington-based weekly Seven Days published an insert featuring restaurants participating in Vermont Restaurant Week. I couldn’t wait to sample dishes from some of the highly touted localvore eateries I’d read about since moving to Vermont three years earlier.
When I opened up the insert, however, the number of advertisements featuring photos of hamburgers and fries surprised me.

Peak Phosphorous: Crisis in the Making or Radical Opportunity?

Written by Tatiana Schreiber | November 24, 2013

Jay Bailey, of Fair Winds Farm, in Brattleboro, applying diluted human urine to his hayfield using horses.

For many years environmental activists have used the term “peak oil” to refer to the coming crisis in availability of fossil fuels, and as part of a rhetorical strategy to hasten our shift toward a post-oil economy. Recently, some activists and scientists have begun to talk about another “peak” crisis: that of phosphorous.

How to Get Grounded

Young farmers in Vermont surmount the high cost of land with support from family, friends, and investors

Written by Andrew Stowe | August 19, 2013

Edge Fuentes

On a road in Cabot, not far from the land that Laura Dale and Cyrus Pond bought this past March, you can look out to the west at a horizon dominated by the undulating spine of the Green Mountains. For many young farmers in Vermont, the cost of land can seem as daunting and insurmountable as the largest of those mountains in the dead of winter.

A Fly in the Ointment

Fruit Growers Face a New Pest

Written by Vern Grubinger | July 03, 2013

Spotted wing drosophila

There’s a small insect causing big damage to soft fruits that ripen late in the season. It’s new to our area, and spreading fast. Spotted wing drosophila (SWD) has been buzzing across the country for the past few years. First, it was found in California in 2008; then in 2009 it moved to Florida, Oregon, and Washington. From Florida, it moved up the East Coast to arrive in New England in 2011, and last year it was found across much of Vermont.

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What we do

A quarterly magazine devoted to covering local food, sustainable farming, and the many people building the Vermont food system.

Vermont's Local Banquet Magazine illuminates the connections between local food and Vermont communities. Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape is changing as the localvore movement shapes what is grown and raised here.

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