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Set the Table with Poutine

Written by Claire Fitts Georges | November 15, 2016

Cheese curds

I grew up in California, in a world of dayboat salmon, tofu, and spinach salad. I only became vaguely aware of the odd sounding “poutine” when I moved to Vermont. French fries with gravy and cheese curds? I mean, that all sounds weird enough without including the word “curds” at the end.

Hügelkultur: A Rotting Resource

Written by Angie Knost | August 17, 2016

Hügelkultur bed

Hügelkultur is a centuries-old sustainable method of building raised garden beds in a way that mimics the natural succession of the forest floor.

Grow Where You Work

Written by Charlie Nardozzi | May 25, 2016

Northeast Kingdom Community Action – Barton

Across the country, employees are realizing the benefits of gardening where they work. And as company wellness programs proliferate, employers are looking for creative ways to engage their staff.

The Great Garden Cover Up

Written by Charlie Nardozzi | February 09, 2016

Charlie Nardozzi workshop

Cover crops and green manures may be terms you usually associate with farming, but they’re important for even a small-scale home gardener. “Cover crops” usually refers to grains or legumes grown in fall to “cover” the soil in winter.

Set the Table with Bone Stock

Written by Leda Scheintaub | November 24, 2015

Set the Table with Bone Stock

When Rebecca Wood and I were writing The Whole Bowl a couple of years ago, we had no idea that bone-based broths were just about to become the next biggest thing in food.

Aronia and Elderberry: Thy Medicine

Written by Nancy Hayden | August 24, 2015

Elderberry Shurbs

Aronia and elderberry are two fruits—native to Vermont and other places in the eastern United States—that are getting noticed by health-conscious consumers. The word on the street these days is “nutraceutical”—in this case, referring to berries that aren’t just nutritious but also have medicinal properties.

Polyphony in the Garden

Written by Tatiana Schreiber | May 26, 2015

Hummingbird moth on bergamot

When I work in the garden, surrounded by vegetables, flowering plants, and herbs, with several species of bees buzzing in the big, purple, flowering clusters of anise hyssop at the ends of all the beds, and a breeze fluttering the leaves of the maples and oaks in the woods nearby, I sense polyphony at work in the natural world.

Set the Table with Cultured Foods

Written by Leda Scheintaub | February 11, 2015

Pickled turnips

Introducing bold-flavored ferments—from the spicy kick of kimchi to the sour tang of kefir and the refreshing effervescence of kombucha and beyond—into your culinary repertoire opens a new world of taste sensations. Fermentation becomes a happy compulsion.

Set the Table with Homemade Local Baby Food

Written by Sarah Galbraith | November 16, 2014

Baby Food Pureed Squash

Many of us spend the fall preserving the local flavors of the harvest season. Squash, apples, beets, carrots, and the year’s final greens are cellared, canned, and frozen. But the anticipated addition to our family of a new little one has me preserving these foods in a new way: as homemade baby food.

Set the Table with Mutton

Written by Katie Sullivan | August 21, 2014

Sheep in pasture

I once had a “wild” sheep named Janet. When I would walk down to the field where she was kept with the other sheep, she would observe me with calm confidence. Then, when I would open the gate from one enclosure to the next, she’d jump the fence and run away up the hill.

Set the Table with Seaberries

Written by Vera Chang | May 23, 2014

seaberries

I’d never actually seen a sea buckthorn plant or eaten any of its berries until I moved to Vermont. Already familiar with sea buckthorn in my skincare products, I was inspired to learn more. And when I did: zing, zest, tang! I was struck by sea buckthorn berries’ complex, passionfruit, citrus-like flavor. It was like nothing I’ve tasted.

Set the Table with Dandelion Greens

Written by Helen Labun Jordan | February 19, 2014

Dandelion harvesting at Zack Woods

I’ve spent years walking past any dandelion greens I see for sale, on the grounds that I will not pay for something that’s growing everywhere I look all spring and summer. Granted, I never stop to pick those free dandelion leaves, so inevitably, a vegetable that I won’t buy because it’s too common ends up not being at all common on my plate. It’s the Dandelion Paradox. This past winter, I wanted to unravel it.

Set the Table with Quince

Written by Lindsay Arbuckle | November 24, 2013

Quince

The first time I met a quince, I was immediately smitten. There were plenty of beautiful apples around, but that box of quince enticed me with its sweet, exotic aroma. Could I possibly describe the complex fragrance? Why hadn’t I seen or tasted one before?

Putting the Garden to Bed

Written by Henry Homeyer | August 19, 2013

Various garden photos

There are many distractions at this time of year, whether school or watching football or catching up on work and e-mail after an August vacation. But one thing’s for sure: autumn—and winter—are coming, and we need to put our gardens to bed. A little extra work now will help us garden even better next year.

Set the Table with Garlic Scapes

Written by Claire Fitts Georges | July 03, 2013

Garlic Scapes

Garlic scapes are one of those totally edible and delicious things that most people don’t even know exist. Every spring, hardneck varieties of garlic (having overwintered but not ready to harvest until July) send up a curlycue stem with a bulbil up top. The bulbil is sort of a mini bulb that can grow new garlic in a couple years or just be eaten like garlic right now.

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What we do

A quarterly magazine devoted to covering local food, sustainable farming, and the many people building the Vermont food system.

Vermont's Local Banquet Magazine illuminates the connections between local food and Vermont communities. Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape is changing as the localvore movement shapes what is grown and raised here.

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