• Editor's Note Winter 2017

    Editor's Note Winter 2017

    “If you’re going to Québec City, you have to visit a cabane à sucre,” said Claire. And her good advice was confirmed as soon as my partner and I walked into Cabane à Sucre Leclerc in Neuville on a chilly, snowy evening.

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  • Set the Table with Poutine

    Set the Table with Poutine

    I grew up in California, in a world of dayboat salmon, tofu, and spinach salad. I only became vaguely aware of the odd sounding “poutine” when I moved to Vermont. French fries with gravy and cheese curds? I mean, that all sounds weird enough without including the word “curds” at the end.

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  • Along the Route des Vins

    Along the Route des Vins

    In the first unpredictable weeks of spring, workers at Québec’s Léon Courville vineyard lay the bones of 1,200 tiny bonfires between the vines.

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  • So Close And Yet So Far

    So Close And Yet So Far

    Ask people in agriculture about the challenges of selling Vermont food in Québec, and folks tend to have the same first reaction.

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  • Au Marché

    Au Marché

    On a sunny, crisp day in early September, a friend and I meandered over the border to visit three Québec farmers’ markets.

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  • Neighbors to the North—Of Loaves and Land

    Neighbors to the North—Of Loaves and Land

    Every week at Red Hen Baking Company in Middlesex, six tons of flour is mixed, kneaded, and transformed into 18,000 loaves of bread.

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  • Neighbors to the North—Seeding Relationships

    Neighbors to the North—Seeding Relationships

    Some 20 years ago, when Tom Stearns of High Mowing Seeds was living in Holland, Vermont, just on the border with Québec, he met Laurier Chabot at a biodynamic agriculture conference.

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  • Neighbors to the North—A Vintner Mentor

    Neighbors to the North—A Vintner Mentor

    When David and Linda Boyden started Boyden Valley Winery in Cambridge in 1996, they had zero experience in viticulture or oenology, save for a class that David had taken at Cornell University.

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  • Neighbors to the North—A Plethora of Produce

    Neighbors to the North—A Plethora of Produce

    Imagine two Caesar salads: Both are tossed in that classic salty dressing and topped with croutons, tomatoes, and parmesan cheese. And both salads have, as their base, crisp and crunchy romaine lettuce.

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  • Neighbors to the North—Fields  of  Gold

    Neighbors to the North—Fields of Gold

    Jack Lazor called me at 8:00 p.m. the other night, which surprised me. I’m used to dairy farmer hours, and 8:00 p.m is past bedtime for most dairymen and women I’ve known.

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  • Neighbors to the North—A Porcine Quest

    Neighbors to the North—A Porcine Quest

    Vermont Salumi, a small company making fresh sausages and hand-tied salami in the Italian tradition, is based just outside Plainfield.

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  • To Market, to Bank

    To Market, to Bank

    Québecois grower Jean-Martin Fortier draws a distinction between a good living and a good life.  “’A good living’ mostly refers to how much money you make,” he tells me during a phone call. A good life, in contrast, takes into account “how your time is spent, and to what purpose.”

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  • Last Morsel—My Family’s French Canadian Kitchen

    Last Morsel—My Family’s French Canadian Kitchen

    Whenever I catch a whiff of cinnamon or cloves, my mind drifts to my mother’s kitchen and the French Canadian food traditions that shaped how I learned to cook.

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Publishers' Note Fall 2017

Boys raking up leaves on front lawn, Bradford, Vermont, 1939; photo by Russell Lee, 1903–1986, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, DC.
Boys raking up leaves on front lawn, Bradford, Vermont, 1939

Written on

August 16 , 2017

As the days shorten and the temperatures begin their march south, here in Vermont we are so fortunate to experience Mother Nature’s annual display. It’s always been our favorite time of year; full of abundance from the summer and with a hint of the bittersweet knowledge that winter is next up on the docket. The brilliant days and crisp nights bring the moment into sharp focus and remind us that change is welcome and ever present.

In this issue we give a nod to this intersection of the seasons and the concept of change.
Our editor, Bonnie North, dives into the nuts and bolts of food preservation using two canning methods. She explores the topic from a basic understanding of the process, equipment needed, and procedures to be followed to ensure a safe experience and a safe end product. It’s a timely article full of essential information that will have you savoring summer’s goodness well into the winter months.

Also in the spirit of bridging the seasons, Jesse Natha writes to let us know that cucumbers are far from the only garden offering that should be pickled. We find out that there are a myriad of candidates destined for the pickle jar, which we will be popping open in February.
Sometimes change moves us to rediscover and embrace an old tradition or practice. This is the case with the folks at Elmore Mountain Bread. Looking for a challenge, the bakery ventured into creating their own flourmill using time-honored ideas and designs that they then married with current technologies. As you will discover, the resulting mill is an elegant work of art that produces top-quality flour.

In southern Vermont—working out of a centuries-old stone building—one fiber artist combines wools, the color of a muted landscape, to create sensuous knit hats. This attention to place and materials is reflected in the name of the enterprise: Sky Like Snow. Reminding us of the beautiful, ephemeral, and ever-changing temperament of our natural surroundings.

We also explore change and adaptation in the continuing challenges facing farmers on an ongoing basis. Working to connect young farmers through out the state, the Vermont Young Farmers Coalition helps facilitate networking and addresses many of these challenges by building community.

While summer winds down and autumn begins to construct its wondrous riot of color, let’s remember to pause, breathing in and embracing the changes that are sure to come.

Meg Lucas
Barbi Schreiber

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A quarterly magazine devoted to covering local food, sustainable farming, and the many people building the Vermont food system.

Vermont's Local Banquet Magazine illuminates the connections between local food and Vermont communities. Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape is changing as the localvore movement shapes what is grown and raised here.

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