• Editor's Note Spring 2016

    Editor's Note Spring 2016

    Last fall I was an intern on a Vermont sheep and fruit farm, and over the course of three weeks I used parts of my brain that I tap so rarely they might as well be located in my elbow. Normally I spend my days as a writer and editor, working with words, and like most of us I don’t tax my thinking beyond what my chosen line of work asks of me. My brain is narrow. It is used to doing one or two things well.

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  • The Great Garden Cover Up

    The Great Garden Cover Up

    Cover crops and green manures may be terms you usually associate with farming, but they’re important for even a small-scale home gardener. “Cover crops” usually refers to grains or legumes grown in fall to “cover” the soil in winter.

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  • Set the Table with Local Oils

    Set the Table with Local Oils

    Netaka White remembers going to some of the first local food challenges in Vermont—potluck meals to which attendees would bring food that was entirely grown or raised within Vermont, or a 50-mile radius.

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  • The Huntress

    The Huntress

    In 2013, Murphy Robinson asked to buy a live lamb from our farm. It would, she explained, be used in her first Huntress Intensive, a weekend workshop for women on how to hunt, and it would be taken from live to butchered in order to teach how to properly field dress an animal.

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  • Home for Supper

    Home for Supper

    Ask a longtime Vermont fruit grower or gardener about Lewis Hill and they’ll probably tell you how he inspired and nurtured their love of growing fruit. Maybe he introduced them to uncommon fruits such as black currants and elderberry.

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  • A Rising Collaboration

    A Rising Collaboration

    Once upon a time, in cobblestoned villages across Europe, brewers and bakers depended on each other, trading beer and spent grains for loaves of bread made with those grains. But on our side of the Atlantic, this relationship has largely been lacking.

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  • The Shearer’s Daughter

    The Shearer’s Daughter

    During peak shearing seasons, Gwen often leaves her house at 4 a.m. and doesn’t return until after 10 p.m. Over those long days she might shear more than 100 sheep and drive several hundred miles, barely stopping for a meal. She estimates that annually she drives 40,000 miles and shears 8,000 to 10,000 sheep.

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  • Building Brands in a Small Farm Food System

    Building Brands in a Small Farm Food System

    Small farms in Vermont contribute tremendous value to our evolving food system by being nimble enough to respond to shifting consumer demand quickly. Small farms have pioneered niche products, such as multi-variety mesclun mixes and hybrid CSA memberships.

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  • Farmers' Kitchen—Caprine Cake

    Farmers' Kitchen—Caprine Cake

    AlpineGlo Farm, tucked on a hillside in Westminster, has been the site of our homestead since 2001. We originally intended the property to be a place to raise and train horses, as my husband and I both have a strong equine background, but we soon found many more uses for the land.

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  • Last Morsel—A Slow Tan

    Last Morsel—A Slow Tan

    Sheep aren’t raised for their skins, but the soft pelts that are a byproduct of meat and wool production are a fluffy reward for farmers and homesteaders who spend many hours tending their flocks.

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 Katie Spring

Katie Spring

Katie Spring is co-owner of Good Heart Farmstead in Worcester, a CSA farm with a mission to make local food more accessible. She finds time to write in between pulling weeds and sowing seeds. Follow the farm on Instagram: @goodheartfarmstead.

Set the Table with Rabbit

Written by Katie Spring Katie Sullivan | May 26, 2015

Sarah

I circulated the room with a tray of hors d’oeuvres, weaving through bridesmaids, groomsmen, and guests. The social hour was winding down, and by my fifth or sixth pass through the crowd, I knew who the vegetarians were—who to offer the stuffed mushrooms to, who to pass by with the pulled pork.

Farmer Wordplay: Harvest vs. Slaughter

Written by Katie Spring | November 17, 2014

Chickens

With both hands, I reach into the crate of chickens. “I’m sorry!” I say to the chicken as it flaps in my less-than-confident grasp. The butcher just showed me how to properly handle a bird: two hands on their legs, chest down, and pick up. They won’t flap this way. I put the bird’s chest on the ground until it calms and hand it to the butcher.

Set the Table with Gluten-free baked goods

Written by Katie Spring | June 01, 2012

Suzanne

We fell in love over dessert—pie to be specific—and when our relationship began, a friend exclaimed to Edge, “This is perfect! Katie loves to bake, and you love to eat baked goods!” The truth is, we both love to bake and eat, so for one whole summer we enticed each other with homemade bread, muffins, and treats made of flour and sugar and butter, stuffing dozens of cookies in our packs for each climbing or hiking trip. During that same summer, Edge was battling a parasite he’d picked up in Mexico the winter before. After many weeks of seeing naturopathic doctors, he finally gave in to a three-day antibiotic regimen, which killed the parasite for good and wiped his gut clean at the same time. That changed everything.

What we do

A quarterly magazine devoted to covering local food, sustainable farming, and the many people building the Vermont food system.

Vermont's Local Banquet Magazine illuminates the connections between local food and Vermont communities. Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape is changing as the localvore movement shapes what is grown and raised here.

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