• Publishers' Note—Fall 2016

    Publishers' Note—Fall 2016

    For the past several years now, we’ve composted our garden and kitchen scraps. With increased success, we’ve watched apple cores and tomato vines metamorphose into a rich, dark, crumbly hummus.

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  • Hügelkultur: A Rotting Resource

    Hügelkultur: A Rotting Resource

    Hügelkultur is a centuries-old sustainable method of building raised garden beds in a way that mimics the natural succession of the forest floor.

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  • Set the Table with…Figs

    Set the Table with…Figs

    Figs may not seem like a Vermont kind of crop—the fruits are more associated with warmer climates. However, one local Vermonter has dug into his Italian roots and has been successfully growing figs for five years.

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  • Flock Dance:

    Flock Dance:

    Yesenia Major—who runs Vermont Shepherd sheep dairy with her husband, David—is a dancer at heart. With Spanish, Dominican, and El Salvadorian roots, she grew up in communities where “we were born dancing.”

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  • Vermont Apples: Lost and Found

    Vermont Apples: Lost and Found

    Roaming the hills and back roads in Vermont at this time of year, you find plenty of apple trees. Most are wild trees, also called seedling trees, spread by wildlife or from dropped apples.

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  • Regenerative Agriculture

    Regenerative Agriculture

    In 2012, new farmers Jesse McDougall and his wife, Cally, decided not to spray the kinds of chemical pesticides and fertilizers that had long been applied to their hayfields in Shaftsbury.

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  • Crafty Cultivation

    Crafty Cultivation

    The old adage says, “Necessity is the mother of invention,” but the small farmer’s credo would be a lot more specific: “A sore back will get you scheming for a better way.”

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  • Small Acts Bring Permaculture Out of the Backyard and into the Community

    Small Acts Bring Permaculture Out of the Backyard and into the Community

    On August 28, 2011, when Tropical Storm Irene hit parts of Vermont with almost 10 inches of rain, the waters of the Saxtons River rose up in an uncontrollable torrent of historic proportions.

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  • Slow and Steady: Vermont’s “Snail of Approval”

    Slow and Steady: Vermont’s “Snail of Approval”

    “Snail of Approval” is a program of Slow Food Vermont. It’s a certification awarded to restaurants, bars, food and beverage producers, stores, and markets that have been deemed “outstanding among peers” and that contribute to “the quality, authenticity, and sustainability of Vermont’s food supply.”

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  • Farmers' Kitchen—Magnificent Mushrooms

    Farmers' Kitchen—Magnificent Mushrooms

    Many of us are brought up to fear mushrooms. Often to the point of never thinking of them as the wonderful, delicious, and nutritious food they are.

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  • Release

    Release

    I began farming in 2008, moving from books to hands-on experience raising crops, sheep, dairy goats, and poultry.

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Nancy Hayden

Nancy Hayden

Nancy Hayden is an artist, writer, and organic farmer. Nancy and her husband own and operate The Farm Between, an organic fruit farm and fruit nursery in Jeffersonville. They, too, are apple enthusiasts. You can learn more about her and John’s farm products and plants at thefarmbetween.com. Nancy’s art and writing can be explored on her website.

The State of the Bees

Written by Nancy Hayden | November 17, 2014

Nancy

Winter is a great time to cozy up next to the wood stove with a mug of honey tea and read about bees. My own honeybees are snug in their beehives, but they’re probably not reading. They’ve formed a tight, buzzing cluster that keeps the colony remarkably warm even during the coldest winter nights.

Farm-ecology

How one Vermont farm is addressing climate change and pollinator loss.

Written by Nancy Hayden | May 23, 2014

Apple

My husband, John, reminds me every so often that in a world of seven billion people it is a privilege to own land. This is a good thing to contemplate as I stack brush and run it through the wood chipper. After a long winter, I’m already feeling the ache in my back and shoulders from only a few hours of work.

What we do

A quarterly magazine devoted to covering local food, sustainable farming, and the many people building the Vermont food system.

Vermont's Local Banquet Magazine illuminates the connections between local food and Vermont communities. Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape is changing as the localvore movement shapes what is grown and raised here.

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