• Publishers' Note—Fall 2016

    Publishers' Note—Fall 2016

    For the past several years now, we’ve composted our garden and kitchen scraps. With increased success, we’ve watched apple cores and tomato vines metamorphose into a rich, dark, crumbly hummus.

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  • Hügelkultur: A Rotting Resource

    Hügelkultur: A Rotting Resource

    Hügelkultur is a centuries-old sustainable method of building raised garden beds in a way that mimics the natural succession of the forest floor.

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  • Set the Table with…Figs

    Set the Table with…Figs

    Figs may not seem like a Vermont kind of crop—the fruits are more associated with warmer climates. However, one local Vermonter has dug into his Italian roots and has been successfully growing figs for five years.

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  • Flock Dance:

    Flock Dance:

    Yesenia Major—who runs Vermont Shepherd sheep dairy with her husband, David—is a dancer at heart. With Spanish, Dominican, and El Salvadorian roots, she grew up in communities where “we were born dancing.”

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  • Vermont Apples: Lost and Found

    Vermont Apples: Lost and Found

    Roaming the hills and back roads in Vermont at this time of year, you find plenty of apple trees. Most are wild trees, also called seedling trees, spread by wildlife or from dropped apples.

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  • Regenerative Agriculture

    Regenerative Agriculture

    In 2012, new farmers Jesse McDougall and his wife, Cally, decided not to spray the kinds of chemical pesticides and fertilizers that had long been applied to their hayfields in Shaftsbury.

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  • Crafty Cultivation

    Crafty Cultivation

    The old adage says, “Necessity is the mother of invention,” but the small farmer’s credo would be a lot more specific: “A sore back will get you scheming for a better way.”

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  • Small Acts Bring Permaculture Out of the Backyard and into the Community

    Small Acts Bring Permaculture Out of the Backyard and into the Community

    On August 28, 2011, when Tropical Storm Irene hit parts of Vermont with almost 10 inches of rain, the waters of the Saxtons River rose up in an uncontrollable torrent of historic proportions.

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  • Slow and Steady: Vermont’s “Snail of Approval”

    Slow and Steady: Vermont’s “Snail of Approval”

    “Snail of Approval” is a program of Slow Food Vermont. It’s a certification awarded to restaurants, bars, food and beverage producers, stores, and markets that have been deemed “outstanding among peers” and that contribute to “the quality, authenticity, and sustainability of Vermont’s food supply.”

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  • Farmers' Kitchen—Magnificent Mushrooms

    Farmers' Kitchen—Magnificent Mushrooms

    Many of us are brought up to fear mushrooms. Often to the point of never thinking of them as the wonderful, delicious, and nutritious food they are.

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  • Release

    Release

    I began farming in 2008, moving from books to hands-on experience raising crops, sheep, dairy goats, and poultry.

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 Katie Spring

Katie Spring

Katie Spring is co-owner of Good Heart Farmstead in Worcester, a CSA farm with a mission to make local food more accessible. She finds time to write in between pulling weeds and sowing seeds. Follow the farm on Instagram: @goodheartfarmstead.

Set the Table with Rabbit

Written by Katie Spring Katie Sullivan | May 26, 2015

Sarah

I circulated the room with a tray of hors d’oeuvres, weaving through bridesmaids, groomsmen, and guests. The social hour was winding down, and by my fifth or sixth pass through the crowd, I knew who the vegetarians were—who to offer the stuffed mushrooms to, who to pass by with the pulled pork.

Farmer Wordplay: Harvest vs. Slaughter

Written by Katie Spring | November 17, 2014

Chickens

With both hands, I reach into the crate of chickens. “I’m sorry!” I say to the chicken as it flaps in my less-than-confident grasp. The butcher just showed me how to properly handle a bird: two hands on their legs, chest down, and pick up. They won’t flap this way. I put the bird’s chest on the ground until it calms and hand it to the butcher.

Set the Table with Gluten-free baked goods

Written by Katie Spring | June 01, 2012

Suzanne

We fell in love over dessert—pie to be specific—and when our relationship began, a friend exclaimed to Edge, “This is perfect! Katie loves to bake, and you love to eat baked goods!” The truth is, we both love to bake and eat, so for one whole summer we enticed each other with homemade bread, muffins, and treats made of flour and sugar and butter, stuffing dozens of cookies in our packs for each climbing or hiking trip. During that same summer, Edge was battling a parasite he’d picked up in Mexico the winter before. After many weeks of seeing naturopathic doctors, he finally gave in to a three-day antibiotic regimen, which killed the parasite for good and wiped his gut clean at the same time. That changed everything.

What we do

A quarterly magazine devoted to covering local food, sustainable farming, and the many people building the Vermont food system.

Vermont's Local Banquet Magazine illuminates the connections between local food and Vermont communities. Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape is changing as the localvore movement shapes what is grown and raised here.

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