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2015

Vermont Veggies Find New Markets

Written by Sarah Waring Alissa Matthews | February 13, 2015

The work crew at Chapelles potato farm

There’s no vegetable more basic than a potato. This humble, tuberous root crop, Solanum tuberosum, grows in the dark, hidden from view most of the year, and emerges late when the air is frosty.

All Hands on Deck

Salvation Farms is counting on prison inmates to fill a gap in the local food system

Written by Suzanne Podhaizer | November 17, 2014

Hands holding apples

As a farmer, I’ve become a collector of vegetables. But as we all know, vegetables cannot last forever. That is, unless you put them in a jar with some salt, a sprinkling of peppercorns, and a few cloves of garlic. Pickling is an essential way for us to eat from our gardens while the plants sleep beneath snow. But for me, pickling’s greatest joy is this: It gives me an excuse to use my jars.

Farmers' Kitchen—Indian Summer

| August 25, 2015

Lini Mazumdar and Emmett Dunbar, photo by Celia Kelly

We chose “Anjali”—a Sanskrit word meaning “offerings to the deities”—as the name of our farm to honor Lini’s Indian heritage. And since moving to our South Londonderry farm on the winter solstice of 2000, we have grown mixed vegetables, medicinal herbs, blueberries, raspberries, and hops in harmony with our ecosystem and the cosmos.

Rural Vermont at 30: Supporting Farmers to Sustain Farming

Written by Andrea Stander | May 20, 2015

Anthony Pollina one of the founders of Rural Vermont

In early April, on an evening that concluded with yet another “surprise” late-season snowstorm, more than 100 people gathered at the historic Capital City Grange Hall on the edge of Montpelier to celebrate the official beginning of Rural Vermont’s 30th anniversary.

Farmers' Kitchen—Porcine Preparation

| February 13, 2015

David Hull and family

At our farm here in Newfane, the pigs are the favorites of all of us. The lambs and goat kids don’t really give us the time of day, and our girls get a little nervous trying to pet the steer like I do. But the pigs are always happy to have us around.

Farmers' Kitchen—Jam with Character

Written by David Fried | November 17, 2014

David Fried

Do you ever wonder why fruit grown in Vermont—on your own trees, vines, and shrubs—tastes so amazing? The king and queen of Atlantis didn’t get anything close to this. Well, maybe.

What Is Fresh?

| August 25, 2015

vine ripe tomatoes

Ask Vermont food enthusiasts what they love about local food and most of us say, “It’s fresh.” The link between fresh flavor and local food is so strong that the terms often appear as one: “Fresh local food!”

Farmers' Kitchen—Okra!

| May 27, 2015

The crew at Clear Brook Farm

Although we farm in Vermont, one of our favorite vegetables to grow, and especially to eat, is a staple from the South: okra. On our farm in Shaftsbury, where we grow between 25 and 30 acres of veggies and small fruits—everything from asparagus to… well, yes… zucchini—it’s the letter O in which one of our true vegetable passions rests. Okra!

Last Morsel—Farming Solo

Written by Ryan Demarest | February 13, 2015

Ryan Demarest

This past summer I embarked on my first foray into agriculture on a small piece of land in Waterbury. While I took some time to get settled, by mid-season I was attending a farmers’ market, selling to various restaurants and stores, and maintaining a small farm stand.

Farmer Wordplay: Harvest vs. Slaughter

Written by Katie Spring | November 17, 2014

Chickens

With both hands, I reach into the crate of chickens. “I’m sorry!” I say to the chicken as it flaps in my less-than-confident grasp. The butcher just showed me how to properly handle a bird: two hands on their legs, chest down, and pick up. They won’t flap this way. I put the bird’s chest on the ground until it calms and hand it to the butcher.

Last Morsel—Reliving History through Food in Burlington

Written by Pamela Hunt | May 20, 2015

tour group on St. George Street, Burlington VT

I swirled the creamy beans, sweet chunks of zucchini, and crunchy corn niblets in the last of the lemon-herb vinaigrette at the bottom of my dish. This salad had a story to tell, and I was hungry to hear it. Lucky for me, I was in the right place: Sugarsnap restaurant at the Echo Center, the first stop on the Burlington Edible History Tour.

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What we do

A quarterly magazine devoted to covering local food, sustainable farming, and the many people building the Vermont food system.

Vermont's Local Banquet Magazine illuminates the connections between local food and Vermont communities. Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape is changing as the localvore movement shapes what is grown and raised here.

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