Editor's Note Fall 2015

Written by Caroline Abels | August 19, 2015

Dairy farmer picking up potatoes on his farm near Fairfield, Vermont, September 1941.

I’m writing this in early August, on the heels of Vermont Open Farm Week—seven days during which 75 farms, orchards, vineyards, distilleries, and nurseries opened their doors to the public for a concentrated week of public outreach.

Publishers' Note

Written by Meg Lucas | May 26, 2015

Anise hyssop

When they harnessed fire, by some accounts more than 1.5 million years ago, our distant ancestors changed the course of their evolution and, ultimately, ours. Not only was light and warmth brought into their lives, but the act of cooking food is thought to have increased brain size and put us on the path to becoming Homo Sapiens.

Editor's Note Spring 2015

| February 11, 2015

Tapping maple trees

When Paul McCartney popped up on my computer screen recently, I wanted to believe him. Who wouldn’t be prepared to trust a man who wrote and sang “Blackbird” and “Good Day Sunshine” and “Penny Lane”?

Publishers' Note Winter 2015

| November 16, 2014

Mr. G.W. Clarke coming to town to sell butter on a Saturday in the winter of 1939, Woodstock, Vermont.

They’ve already started to arrive in the mailbox: seed catalogs, with their glorious photos and wonderful illustrations, calling to us, announcing the promise of a future garden—and of spring. We’re in!

Aronia and Elderberry: Thy Medicine

Written by Nancy Hayden | August 24, 2015

Elderberry Shurbs

Aronia and elderberry are two fruits—native to Vermont and other places in the eastern United States—that are getting noticed by health-conscious consumers. The word on the street these days is “nutraceutical”—in this case, referring to berries that aren’t just nutritious but also have medicinal properties.

Polyphony in the Garden

Written by Tatiana Schreiber | May 26, 2015

Hummingbird moth on bergamot

When I work in the garden, surrounded by vegetables, flowering plants, and herbs, with several species of bees buzzing in the big, purple, flowering clusters of anise hyssop at the ends of all the beds, and a breeze fluttering the leaves of the maples and oaks in the woods nearby, I sense polyphony at work in the natural world.

Set the Table with Cultured Foods

Written by Leda Scheintaub | February 11, 2015

Pickled turnips

Introducing bold-flavored ferments—from the spicy kick of kimchi to the sour tang of kefir and the refreshing effervescence of kombucha and beyond—into your culinary repertoire opens a new world of taste sensations. Fermentation becomes a happy compulsion.

Set the Table with Homemade Local Baby Food

Written by Sarah Galbraith | November 16, 2014

Baby Food Pureed Squash

Many of us spend the fall preserving the local flavors of the harvest season. Squash, apples, beets, carrots, and the year’s final greens are cellared, canned, and frozen. But the anticipated addition to our family of a new little one has me preserving these foods in a new way: as homemade baby food.

Set the Table with Garlic

Written by Laura Sorkin | August 24, 2015

Basket of Garlic

If you search the word garlic online, you may end up believing it is the panacea for all that ails us. Garlic was given to soldiers and athletes in ancient Greece to promote vigor.

Set the Table with Rabbit

Written by Katie Spring Katie Sullivan | May 26, 2015

Sarah Ouellette of Silver Ridge Rabbitry

I circulated the room with a tray of hors d’oeuvres, weaving through bridesmaids, groomsmen, and guests. The social hour was winding down, and by my fifth or sixth pass through the crowd, I knew who the vegetarians were—who to offer the stuffed mushrooms to, who to pass by with the pulled pork.

Spring Vinegars

Herbal Infusions for Health and Flavor

Written by Juliette Abigail Carr | February 11, 2015

dandelion, chickweed, burdock, and nettles

As the earth reawakens from winter’s slumber, it takes time for the sun’s warmth to turn the earth over to spring, coaxing new growth out of last year’s seed. The same is true in our bodies: It takes time to transition from the inwardness of winter to spring’s explosion of vitality.

“Don’t Waste that Woodchuck…”

Written by Rose Paul | November 16, 2014

illustration wikimedia.org, Pearson Scott Foresman collection

That’s what I told friends for two weeks after feasting on woodchuck stew. Don’t waste your pesky garden woodchuck—eat it!

An Early Abenaki Harvest: The Green Corn Celebration

Written by Fred Wiseman | August 24, 2015

Corn dancers

Traditionally, summer was a time of constant and existential worry for Abenaki farmers. Vermont’s notoriously fickle weather inundates the fields in June and parches them in July.

Sun Dance Season: An Abenaki Summer

Written by Fred Wiseman | May 26, 2015

The directional dancers honor the Sun Dancer. Sun Dance practice, Lake Champlain Maritime Museum.

For the Abenaki, summer officially begins during the hoeing and planting times, what we consider late spring, and lasts up to the Green Corn Festival, the official “kick-off” of the harvest.

The Seeds of Renewal Project

Renewing Abenaki agriculture, one seed at a time

Written by Fred Wiseman | February 12, 2015

The Koasek Abenaki Sun Dancer at the 2014 Harvest Celebration, Piermont, NH.

Back in the 1950s and 60s, I often visited my grandparents in northwestern Vermont during the summers. I remember children and teenagers enthusiastically riding their bikes with bucket and spinning rod, heading down to the Missisquoi River to fish.

[12 3  >>  

What we do

A quarterly magazine devoted to covering local food, sustainable farming, and the many people building the Vermont food system.

Vermont's Local Banquet Magazine illuminates the connections between local food and Vermont communities. Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape is changing as the localvore movement shapes what is grown and raised here.


Sign up for quarterly notifications and issue highlights.
Please wait