2014

Editor's Note Fall 2014

Written by Caroline Abels | August 21, 2014

Mrs. Alice White at the Victory Store vegetable counter in Hardwick, 1942

Recently I was at a potluck put on by Slow Food Vermont, chatting with a local homesteader about food and ag, and I ended up telling her:
“I’m not a foodie—I’m a farmie.”

Publishers' Note Summer 2014

| May 23, 2014

Rice plants

We’re turning 7 this summer! It’s amazing to think that Local Banquet has had the privilege of chronicling the local and sustainable food movement here in the state as it has grown up. Of course we owe a tremendous amount to the folks who, in the 1970s, came to Vermont to start the work and give us a solid foundation: knowledge passed from one generation to the next.

Editor's Note Spring 2014

| February 19, 2014

Sugaring 1974 Barre, VT

Every now and then, I wonder what life would be like without any small farms. If Vermont’s diversified farmers were to pack up and sell out. If there were no longer a neighborhood farmers’ market to wander through on a Saturday morning. If those of us who regularly buy local food had to go back to fondling Chilean apples and freakishly large carrots at the grocery store.

Publishers' Note Winter 2014

| November 24, 2013

Ice harvesting circa 1903; Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

Coming in from a cold, bleak winter day into the warmth and bustle of a winter farmers’ market brings a certain elation and reminds us of the spirit of community and the life force still in all things at this darkest time of year. 

Set the Table with Mutton

Written by Katie Sullivan | August 21, 2014

Sheep in pasture

I once had a “wild” sheep named Janet. When I would walk down to the field where she was kept with the other sheep, she would observe me with calm confidence. Then, when I would open the gate from one enclosure to the next, she’d jump the fence and run away up the hill.

Set the Table with Seaberries

Written by Vera Chang | May 23, 2014

seaberries

I’d never actually seen a sea buckthorn plant or eaten any of its berries until I moved to Vermont. Already familiar with sea buckthorn in my skincare products, I was inspired to learn more. And when I did: zing, zest, tang! I was struck by sea buckthorn berries’ complex, passionfruit, citrus-like flavor. It was like nothing I’ve tasted.

Set the Table with Dandelion Greens

Written by Helen Labun Jordan Helen Labun | February 19, 2014

Dandelion harvesting at Zack Woods

I’ve spent years walking past any dandelion greens I see for sale, on the grounds that I will not pay for something that’s growing everywhere I look all spring and summer. Granted, I never stop to pick those free dandelion leaves, so inevitably, a vegetable that I won’t buy because it’s too common ends up not being at all common on my plate. It’s the Dandelion Paradox. This past winter, I wanted to unravel it.

Set the Table with Quince

Written by Lindsay Arbuckle | November 24, 2013

Quince

The first time I met a quince, I was immediately smitten. There were plenty of beautiful apples around, but that box of quince enticed me with its sweet, exotic aroma. Could I possibly describe the complex fragrance? Why hadn’t I seen or tasted one before?

Make Your Own Immune-Boosting Cough Syrup

Written by Juliette Abigail Carr | August 22, 2014

Elecampane

With cold season fast approaching and the autumn harvest at hand, consider creating this tasty, family-friendly remedy for winter ailments. As well as relieving those irritating coughs, this homemade cough syrup is a powerful immune booster.

Growing Unusual Veggies

Written by Henry Homeyer | May 23, 2014

Happy Rich and kohlrabi

Just because we live in northern New England doesn’t mean we have to subsist on carrots and potatoes. These familiar vegetables grow well for us despite our cool nights and relatively short summers. But so do tomatoes, a warm-climate vegetable, and other frost-sensitive vegetables like summer squashes, beans, and cukes. What we grow is largely what we know—and what our Grannies grew—but it doesn’t have to be this way.

Think Globally, Dine Locally

Vermont restaurants use nearby ingredients to create far-from-home dishes

Written by MK Bateman | February 21, 2014

Mushroom Polenta at MINT

Last year I was excited when the Burlington-based weekly Seven Days published an insert featuring restaurants participating in Vermont Restaurant Week. I couldn’t wait to sample dishes from some of the highly touted localvore eateries I’d read about since moving to Vermont three years earlier.
When I opened up the insert, however, the number of advertisements featuring photos of hamburgers and fries surprised me.

Peak Phosphorous: Crisis in the Making or Radical Opportunity?

Written by Tatiana Schreiber | November 24, 2013

Jay Bailey, of Fair Winds Farm, in Brattleboro, applying diluted human urine to his hayfield using horses.

For many years environmental activists have used the term “peak oil” to refer to the coming crisis in availability of fossil fuels, and as part of a rhetorical strategy to hasten our shift toward a post-oil economy. Recently, some activists and scientists have begun to talk about another “peak” crisis: that of phosphorous.

Seeding Variety in Vermont

Written by Allison Teague | August 22, 2014

Kindle Farm

Seed saving—the act (and art) of preserving seeds from plants that are allowed to bolt or mature—has taken on increasing importance of late. With challenges brought on by a changing climate, and with increased efforts by seed companies to corner the seed market, diversity has all but disappeared from available seed stock, and seeds that regenerate themselves have started to become a rarity.

Honey Homeyness

Exploring how Vermont honeys have their own “taste of place.”

Written by Alice Eckles | May 23, 2014

bees at hive

I suppose every beekeeper feels that the place where “their” bees forage is the capital of taste, for it’s true that honey can capture the charms of particular nectars in particular places all over the world.

Fired Up on Local

Written by Caroline Abels | February 21, 2014

Ben Maniscalco

Given that chile peppers—the main ingredient in hot sauce—are relatively easy to grow in Vermont, it’s possible to make hot sauce a highly localvore product. But that doesn’t mean it’s easy. Ben Maniscalco, who launched Benito’s Hot Sauce in 2009, goes out of his way to source ingredients from local farms.

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What we do

A quarterly magazine devoted to covering local food, sustainable farming, and the many people building the Vermont food system.

Vermont's Local Banquet Magazine illuminates the connections between local food and Vermont communities. Our stories, interviews, and essays reveal how Vermont residents are building their local food systems, how farmers are faring in a time of great opportunity and challenge, and how Vermont’s agricultural landscape is changing as the localvore movement shapes what is grown and raised here.

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